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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am 40 and been plowing since before I was old enough to drive.

I always plow very slow just fast enought to keep the truck and the snow moving.If I have a big pile to get thru I take bites out of from different angels it to weeken the pile.I always plow into a lot in heavy snow leaving me a way out so I cant get stuck

I was talking to some folks I know who where laughing at the way I plow explaining to me My style of plowing in antiquated and with the new equiptment you can push faster and more snow then ever.And I am barely useing my trucks cabeability(03 2500hd siverado)

I learned to plow from my dad who was an owner operator and I am now starting to think maybee he did tell me to go easey to avoid breakage.

Then reason I ask this is maninly because one fellow was explaining that when you go fast you throw the snow further.

and you also cause the snow to roll with your plow actually decreasing the work load on your truck.

I have been very sucsessfull with the way I have been plowing for the last 26 years or so with not breaking thing and also not getting stuck in along time.So is there any truth to the speed is less work on the truck?

I have watch some of these guys plow and think they were crazy because they are beating the daylight out of there trucks and them selfs.But I did see the rolling action of snow just rolling like a beach ball in front of there plow

And always felt I moved more snow them them with the slow and steady routine.

What are your thoughts.I feel I am always in control and safe and gentile with my truck its just that rolling action and throwing the snow further away thats making me wonder.From the cab of my truck when I am plowing it does not look like the snow is rolling it just looks like a big pile of snow .Maybee it does roll infront of my plow and I just dont see it .
 

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I don't think there is any problem with your style of plowing. Everyone is different , if you plow long drives of large areas you could probabbly go faster. The fastest I have plowed is about 15 mph max. The speed of plowing will affect the quality of the job as well. The snow will also be thrown farther with speed. So I think that taking it easy will definately not hurt you brand new truck. Just my .02 cents
 

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I think getting the snow to roll of your moldboard will make much less work for the truck. Its much better than having the snow breaking 10-15 feet in front of the blade . Imagine the tonnage being pushed . Saying that ,I wish I could come up to speed with my residential accounts . For me its a treat to see snow rolling off the moldboard .
 

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Sure its fun to see snow rolling off of your moldboard, but if what you do has worked for the last 26 years, why change things. Some people are amazing how they beat the crap out of their truck. Plowing is hard enough on a vehicle. There is a happy medium somewhere in the middle im sure.
 

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I think it all depends on what you are doing, as far as speed goes. I have one account that has a one mile drive. I do that doing 15 to 20 mph. So it takes the snow and throws it off the drive. If I was going slow it would build up next the drive making it harder next time.

On some parts of that same account I can't go any faster than 2 mph. Circle drives are a pain.

The best thing to do is do whatever works for you.

Everett
 

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I plow and always will plow as fast as the condition allow. However always keeping in mind everyone else safely first and foremost.
 

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I usually consider my safety to be of the utmost importance, because if I get injured, then what, I won't put myself in jeopardy to save a stranger, unless the situation calls for something such as that. That said, I never put anyone's life in danger just to sve my own, that would be a little bit too selfish of me.

I also plow as conditions allow, faster in lighter, lesser snows, slower in heavier, deeper snows, it all depends on the pavement condition and snow condition.
 

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ih82plow

When I plowed for a town near me with there truck F350 w/460 engine auto, we used to plow roads between 15-20 mph to trow the snow.There is alot to say that your way works and is still working.Unlesss you go thrue trucks or have major break downs all the time then stick to what works for you.I belive there is a time and a place to go fast .If you hit something going fast you will do some damage to you and your truck so slow is good but it's nice to have the snow go farther so your not always pushing alot of snow.
 

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We plow roadways and large parking lots. Using the Fisher SNO-FOIL, we are able to move the snow pretty far at about 10-15 MPH.
 

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I usually plow atleast at 10 mph when doing a lot.
The big trucks doing highways are doing about 40 mph!
 

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Smaller lot you can't go that fast but the larger ones and the roads we do the faster you go the futher it throws the snow and that is less pushing on the truck. However plowing snow at slower speeds also does cause trans problems also especially if you don't have a steady foot on the gas then on and off the gas causes the trans to shift more and eventually leads to problems.
 

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ih8tplow,

I was taught to plow the same way as you, slow and steady, and I never rush, I use low range whenever the truck starts to even hint at working hard. I don't try to push piles that should be left for backhoe's and loaders. This is the way I have plowed for 27 years. I was also taught by my dad who was an owner operator. I remember his first plow speach to me when he put me behind the wheel like it was yesterday,

He said, "Remember, the faster you go the more force you are creating. If you hit something and your going slow the truck will just stall out, the faster you go the more likely you are to bend or break something and when that happens, the only thing left to do the job is a shovel, and take a wild guess which one of us will be running it"

Needless to say his speech must have sunk in because I have never had to run the shovel.
 

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ahh memories

Gordyo, you just brought back a load of memories as that is just about the same speech that I recieved way back . We had 2 trucks and no backups. Yup you learned to plow careful and smart. The equipment nowadays certainly is better and more comfortable but tougher... ... ??? (certainly more expensive). We have always plowed ,tranfer case in high and the transmission in drive #1 where ever there was a chance that the transmission would come up in the gears. Right or wrong we have never dropped a tranny (knock on wood) Our sander truck is a standard so you just get used to going slower in reverse, sometimes that's not so bad though
just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks guys
I am going to ask my dad.He is still around but no longer an owner operator.He still does snow removal for the company he works for but its all with a loader and a giant pusher blade.

I never thought speed was good.I am going to look at my spedo while plowing I realley dont think I even go 5 mph. I will repost on this topic next time I plow.what ever speed I am doing I am going to step it up a tad to see if it starts to roll.as some one else said the snow seems to be breaking about 15' out in front of my truck.

I also wonder does the type of plow make a difference I have personally been purchasing western plows since 1983.

And as for the fellow who said he doesnt touch a pile that should be left for a backhoe.That also bring's back memories for me because my dad used to tell me to leave that for the operator or am I trying to steel his job also.

And just for the record the properties I plow for sure have enough room and space and lenght to travel at least 40 mph but I still poke along on them.I will update you next storm
 

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Like someone else said earlier- I go as fast as conditions will allow, withing reason of course. I am not as old as you, but I come from the same school of thought, I do not think it is worth the risk of damaging my truck, or someone elses vehicle just to shave a few minutes of time. I always try to use the motto "Work smarter, not harder" in everything I do. It has worked for me so far and helped me get things done efeciently and safely. I rarely get above 5mph when moving snow even in the lots where I have room to go faster- why put the stress on your truck when you come to the end of the run and hit that bank, or even worse, come across something that was buried in the snow. I try to let the snow slow me down at the end of te run instead of using my brakes- too much heating and cooling on the rotors will cause them to warp- IMO. I'd say if you're customers are happy, and your method works for you , then just look at possibly modifying it to roll the snow vs pushing it.

As far as the blades go for rolling- some blades are better than others- my old Diamond and Fisher will roll the snow much better than the Western I own will. I'm only using my Fisher this year, but next year I hope to have to add more trucks and upgrade with some new blades, how does the Blizzard work at rolling the snow? Anyone who got one recently care to comment?
Thanks!

Bill
 

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The 1st few passes of the lots I do I am going slow, just to check if anything new has popped up like a cover or expansion joint, then I pick it up a little bit. I am maybe 10mph.
 

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I would think that if you've been plowing for 26 years and it works for you... then why change? That being said, if you can increase your productivity by increasing your speed conservatively to the point that you feel comfortable that you'll niether damage your truck/equipment, the customer's property or risk injury, then I don't think there is any harm in increasing speed.

I'd look at your production rates and if you're profitable, competetive and otherwise satisfied, than I wouldn't be concerned. Base it off of your production rates if you think you need to speed it up.
 
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