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I have a Fisher SpeedCaster 2 spreader and so far I have done two salting events. An excellent unit, spreads wet magic salt without a problem at all.

Anyway I was reading the owner manual and it said to grease the spreader after each use. That is fine, but how long would you normally have to run the spreader before it would need to be greased? Right now I only have a few accounts and I usually spreads about an half hopper full of salt during each event. To most of you, it probably does not sound much. So I am wondering if greasing it after EACH use for a short period of time is excessive? How will I know when I put in enough grease as not to damage something?

In the owner manual and the label on the spreader, it only shows three greasing points, but to my surprise, I found two more grease fittings that is not shown in diagram. I see two zerks for spinner and three zerks for the bearing (for conveyor belt), which bring a total of 5 zerks. Is that correct?

I only see that two zerks for spinner are greased from the dealer, but it appears that all 3 zerks for bearings never got greased at all because I do not see a spot of grease on any of them. :eek:

Anyway I will need to get a cartridge of grease but I am not really familar in which grease to choose. Fisher manual said to use low temperature synthetic grease. I happen to have small John Deere brochure of 6 different type of greases. The color of grease that dealer used is amber, so I looked at the brochure and there is only one that is in amber color. It is called "Multi-Purpose HD Lithium Complex" grease. The application is listed as for high temperature and extreme pressure, and will work from -20 degrees to 275 degrees F. That sound good to me. It said it is for wheel bearings, univeral joints, suspension systems, ball joints, and anti-friction plain bearings. It also is formulated to prevent corrosion and water washout.

I guess that is the right grease to use, but I want to check first because not a word said "synthetic" but I guess it could be similar or compatible. Thanks.
 

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You're right about that diagram being vague. I guess they assume if they point to one pillow block bearing, one should assume the other 2 same bearings should get the same treatment. But they could point out that the others are on the back side of the view they show, so not shown. Anyway, I just use the grease we use on the lawn equipment & everything else. Spray some oil on the idler pulley as well to try to get more life out of that also. With the amount of salt you are using, my guess would be a greasing every 5 or 6 runs would suffice? Not really sure on that, as you point out there can be great differences in "each use" LOL.
 

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What BRL said is true I don't grease mine up every time i do use the synthetic grease (red ) in color but have used regular grease when I had no synthetic.
 

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As with almost all spreaders and equipment that is used in wet; dirty; and or salty conditions you can't over lubricate the bearings.
You can't think of it as just getting lube into the bearing but as how much water and crud your "flushing out" with the grease that is removed as you push the new grease in.
You still want to use a good water resistant grease.
Wipe off any excess from areas that are around belts or parts that you don't want it to be flung on.
What concerns me is trying to keep the elements out of the motor, have had three in the shop the past two weeks with motors that have been frozen and were badly corroded.
I think I would spray down the motor with a quality penatrating oil so it may have a chance of displacing any water and corrosive material from the motor.
Make sure all your electrical connectors and terminals are coated with "dielectric" grease.

:rolleyes: John...........
 
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