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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much does a yard of salt weigh? I have a sub that salts for me and I want to keep him honest. He charges me by the ton, yet his salter will hold around 2 yards of salt.

Thank you for you input.


Russ
 

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It varies with moisture content, and the corseness of the salt. I use 2000 lbs as a good average, I've seen figures run from 1800 to 2200 lbs per yd.

Are you sure his spreader holds 2 yds? Thats a lot for a pickup V box, unless he has hopper extentions.
 

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Does he load it himself at his own yard or does he pick up at a vendor's location? If he is picking up at a vendor's you could ask for verification by getting a copy of the receipt.

Or you could renegotiate with him and pay him by the application, as the arguments against per ton salting are many, particularly for smaller sized sites which is probably what you're working on with a 2 yd salter.
 

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I also used to use 2000lbs as an estimate for a yard af strait salt. However, I asked recently while I was at the port getting a load and they said that salt weighs in at 2500lbs/ton. I figure that these guys know alot more about it than me, since they work with it every day. Just to see for sure, I took my v-box (which holds 1.8yd) and I weighed out with 2.25tons. Convinced me.
 

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snow_man_48045 said:
So what would be a better buy, 49.00 a ton or 54.00 a yard for bulk untreated salt.
For me, the easiest way to figure it would be to get a "price per pound" so:

At $54/yd = $54/2500# = $0.0216/lb
At $49/Ton = $49/2000# = $0.0245/lb

Better deal is $54/yd
 

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http://www.saltinstitute.org/39.html

When deicing salt falls freely into a pile, it forms a cone with sides that slope at an angle of 32 degrees, salt's natural angle of repose. The density of deicing salt ranges from 72 pounds per cubic foot loose to 84 pounds compacted. When calculating storage space requirements, use the figure 80 pounds per cubic foot or 2160 pounds per cubic yard. Thus, a ton of salt would require 25 cubic feet of storage space.
Also make sure you know what your salt is treated with, if an anti caking agent, then that's not someting to help it melt at lower temps, be sure you are getting othere than treated salt for caking.
 

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Lawngodfather said:
When calculating storage space requirements, use the figure 80 pounds per cubic foot or 2160 pounds per cubic yard. Thus, a ton of salt would require 25 cubic feet of storage space.
Which I still don't understand, because a cubic yard is 27 cubic feet? There was some discussion on this once before.

Compacted? When you ram into a pile of salt with a loader, I would say it is pretty compacted. I always used 1 ton to a yard, but add moisture (which salt companies love) and the weight goes up. All you can do is estimate, because crystal size varies too. The last 25 tons I saw from Cargill, had dust, all the way up to 2" crystals in it. No uniformity at all.

~Chuck
 

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"Originally posted by Lawngodfather
When calculating storage space requirements, use the figure 80 pounds per cubic foot or 2160 pounds per cubic yard. Thus, a ton of salt would require 25 cubic feet of storage space.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Which I still don't understand, because a cubic yard is 27 cubic feet? There was some discussion on this once before. "

They are saying that 2,160 pounds of salt will fill the 27 cubic feet, or 1 cubic yard. 1 ton of salt will fill up 25 cubic feet of space.

snow_man_48045,
You really need to check with the supplier & see what they load with. Some suppliers will sell "by the yard" & use a 1 yard or larger bucket, and the consumer gets more than a yard each time they scoop. Other places don't heap their buckets, or are using a 1.5, 1.7 etc. sized bucket & the consumer may not be getting a full cubic yard. It is very difficult to "judge" a cubic yard when using a loader without measuring. At least with pricing by weight, assuming the scales are calibrated correctly, you are getting what you pay for. I will go to certain suppliers for certain materials because I know they are giving me more than a yard each yard they are selling me, to the point some places are cheaper in the long run than another place that is priced lower per yard.
 

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BRL, they are saying 1 ton (2000#) occupies 25 cubic feet, and 2160 occupies 27 cubic feet (1 cubic yard)

All Imformation I got was from the salt instatute. Follow the link I posted.
 

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Yes LGF, that is exactly what I posted. Why are you telling me what I posted back to me LOL? I can hear my self,
I think? :confused: LOL.
I posted it that way cause Chuck said he was confused by the way the Salt Institute says it. Same info, just a different way to say it really.
 

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Sorry dude, there were so many numbers going around there ya know the "7" looked like a "1" and the "6" looked like a "9" and the "8" looked like a "3".......
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you for the help. My subs v-box holds 1.8 yards and he loads it himself.

Thank you again.

Russ
 

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Well for the past several years I too have been attempting to learn what salt can weight in the field and how much it will really cover. Although there are formula's for all of this, 1 yard =XXXlbs, or 50Lbs will cover XXXX Sqft. there is just too much to factor in to make any hard and fast rules that can be set in stone.

Chuck mentioned the inconsisstancy of the product and the moisture content. I learn also during the summer when I am putting fertilizer applications down. The humidity level WILL change your application rates. This can change from too little to too much product being applied having not only an impact on the the quality of the turf but also an impact on your margins.

So I too mounted (put in truck) and loaded up my 8' V box in the P/U and drove over to the scale. Drove on empty and then loaded the V box level nice and even. Ended up with the a salt weight of 2 tons. This was early in the season 1st load of salt to the yard so I factor in it was not all that wet.

But from the post in this thread you can see that others have also scaled their loaded V box with different result. Even from the real life experiences given I think the 1800lbs - 2200lbs is the safest and closest number per yard I have seen and experienced.

Only thing you can really do is agree on a number you think is fair and use your experience with serivcing locations to keep the sub honest. My guts tells me if I am worried about the sub being honest I have to find a different sub.

Snow business has way too many veriables that effect the out come of labor and amount of product being used (wet heavy snow v. dry fluffy snow, 2" snow that was driven on v. 6" snow not driven on, high ground temps V. low ground temps., 1st salt application v. third application where there was resual melting action, sunny day v. cloudy day, and the list goes on) even with experience there are acceptions to all the rules. If the sub can not be consider creditable than you could really end up not just lossing your A## in margins but also lossing clients all to gather.
 
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