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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at getting an NPR for a work truck, but I need to plow with it in the winter. Thought about doing a 4x4 conversion so it wouldn't be a worry, but has anyone or does anyone plow with just a regular NPR?

If so, how does it do? I don't do parking lots and the like, I build houses so I do our construction drives.

Thanks for any input.
 

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There are a few contractors around my area here who plow with the NPR's or GM equivolents. They all seem to be running the 4x4 versions. There is also a truck dealer located in the next town east of mine (Jukonski Truck) who sells them in the Truck Trader and he always has a few of the 4x4's listed with Fisher or Meyer blades on them. They are a relatively reasonable priced truck so I wouldn't even consider purchasing a 2wd version and spending the money to convert when you can just purchase a factory 4x4.


GOOD LUCK


Jay
 

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4x4 conversion for an NPR?????????

Anyways heres some pics of an NPR I have saved from don't remember where.
 

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I should have one by fall

109" wb is what I am looking for
 

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snowplowjay said:
There are a few contractors around my area here who plow with the NPR's or GM equivolents. They all seem to be running the 4x4 versions. There is also a truck dealer located in the next town east of mine (Jukonski Truck) who sells them in the Truck Trader and he always has a few of the 4x4's listed with Fisher or Meyer blades on them. They are a relatively reasonable priced truck so I wouldn't even consider purchasing a 2wd version and spending the money to convert when you can just purchase a factory 4x4.


GOOD LUCK


Jay

I would think the a 2wd version would be quite workable with a plow if it had at least a few tons of ballast in the backand some good grippy tires. The cab arangement would give very good visabilty plowing it would seem. There are times when I plow in 2wd with my K3500 with 2 to 3000lbs in the bed and it does fine in lots that way. .
 

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The 2WD version works,but you do need a lot of weight,and even then there will be times it will be difficult.The 4WD versions are much better suited to a plow rig.

If your doing construction drives,I think the 4WD would be needed,as you'll be sliding around alot without it.
 

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Our county and state trucks around here push some serious drifted snow here from time to time and they are all 2wd. Some of them have plow frames that attach to the rear axle(s) too for pushing thrust load carring. With proper ballast in it and good tires it will do a fine job with lots. Without any ballast, it will be lacking though.
 

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The problem with using that much weight in an Isuzu (or Hino,etc),is your going to be way over the GVWR.The smaller lighter Hino's don't have real high GVWR's.If they did,the DOT would be running them too.

The 4WD's aren't much more,you might as well buy the right truck.It will last longer too,as you only need enough ballast to offset the plow and balance the truck.You don't need to overload it to get traction.The truck will last much longer carrying less weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the responses.
I figured 4x4 was the way to go (for what I'm doing) it's just hard to find these things around.
 

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wyldman said:


It will last longer too,as you only need enough ballast to offset the plow and balance the truck.You don't need to overload it to get traction.The truck will last much longer carrying less weight.
I do question this though because you want the stronger rear axle to do most of the pushing anyway to extend front drive life and that takes more ballast too.
 

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thesnoman said:
I do question this though because you want the stronger rear axle to do most of the pushing anyway to extend front drive life and that takes more ballast too.
unless a wheel starts slipping both the front and rear will pull equally. since both driveshafts are connected to the same output shaft:rolleyes:

IMO why buy a truck not equipped for the job then overload it to make it work and abuse it? would you plow with a 2wd f150? I wouldnt, but from the sounds of it you would.:shades
 

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thesnoman said:
I do question this though because you want the stronger rear axle to do most of the pushing anyway to extend front drive life and that takes more ballast too.
With a 2WD truck (a pickup for example),will require LOTS of ballast to plow well.A fully loaded salter will do the trick,but your now pushing the limits of the truck,as it's overloaded.The truck will be overworked,just to get traction.

With a 4WD,you only need enough ballast to offset the weight of the plow,and keep the truck balanced.This is usually in the 4-800 lb range for a pickup.you are still well within the load limits of the truck,and it's not working near as hard.Truck is also a lot safer to drive,and much easier to stop.
 

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Big Nate's Plowing said:
unless a wheel starts slipping both the front and rear will pull equally. since both driveshafts are connected to the same output shaft:rolleyes:

IMO why buy a truck not equipped for the job then overload it to make it work and abuse it? would you plow with a 2wd f150? I wouldnt, but from the sounds of it you would.:shades
Not really as in snow, there is always "some" slippage, as minute as it might be. IF you carry ballast in the rear and make rear axle load heavier it will deliver more of the pushing tractive effort.

Putting a few tons in a truck that is rated to haul it is not over loading it unless you are one of those that needs 3/4 ton to "haul" groceries from the store. There are a lot of 2WD stake bed and dump bed one ton trucks here that push snow with great success and long life. About 27 years ago we had a blizzard that had us cut off for about 3 days out in a rural area with 2-3 feet and more of snow on the roads with bigger drifts. When we were finally opened up it was by a little old man with his stock 1954 1 ton chevy 2WD dump bed truck with a 235 6cyl and a old vee plow (it was a bit taller than the front of the hood in center of it too) and a few tons of sand in the back. The county contracted with him for his services. He opened the road with little effort, (the engine did not sound too strained at all) and no traction problems that I saw as he went through drifts as tall as 5 feet in some areas. I visited him for a bit and that he resumed his work.

BTW, More than once I have plowed lots that were mild to moderate in 2WD with no problems with my normal ballast and salt load. I keep trucks for many years and have yet to have the first driveline failure with any of them in service in over 19 years now.
 

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I've seen a few around here. They're Mitsubishi w/ Fishers. I googled "mistubishi fuso 4x4 plow" and came up with this site:
http://www.trucksmaine.com/newtrucks.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page, there's a sweet looking Blizard setup on one. I'd love to have one of those trucks.

Jeff Pierce
 

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That's a 38 hour drive for me to Bangor Maine....

Nice looking truck, but it's a stick.

 
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