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We are doing a quote for an apartment complex. In the picture, most of the spaces will be filled, so we will just open up the lanes. The lanes will be about 25-30ft. We will come back later and clean up the parking spots, and finish the sidewalks. Everything is to scale. We will do the sidewalks in one pass with our ATV, and will hand shovel 6 entryways. I am wondering how long you guys think it would take with an 810. We would probably only use the wings for cleanup and backdragging, because the snow is going to pile up on the blade pretty fast. Our price increments are 2-6" base price, 6-10, base x 1.333, 10-14 base x 1.666, 14+ base x 2. We are planning on $110 per hour with the 810, $60 per hour for the ATV, and $40 per hour for shoveling. How long do you guys think it would take? We were thinking about 3 hrs plowing (1 hr to open up, 2 hrs backdragging and stacking), 1/2 hr. ATV work, and 1 hr. shoveling. Any input woud be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks
 

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We don't really know how to price salting. He requested a quote on salting the whole thing, and just salting the sidewalks. We have a 100 lb. salt spreader on our ATV, so we will be using that.
What is a general rule for salt pricing?
 

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Plllleeeeeeeaaaaaaaaasssssssseeeee???

I usually don't get impatient like this, but the bid is going to be submitted monday. After I read my original post, it wasn't very clear- ***I am just wondering how long you guys think it will take to plow this*** It doesn't have to be for the 810, if you can just give just an estimate for an 8 ft. blade, that would help a ton, too. Also, what do you guys charge for salting in relation to your plowing price? Again, sorry for putting one of "these" posts up, but we really need some input on this one. Thanks
 

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Sorry but you are not getting any help in this area. I know from a few years of belonging to my local Landscaper association that unless u want to hear a pin drop never bring up pricing. Most guys call it price fixing when u discuss it. Personally I have no problem with it. Here in Cleveland we plow at 2" and usually we dont get anymore than 6" at a time. What I can tell you is take the time and price your salt and do it every year. Also your 110/hour price sounds good, but dont stop at just snowplowing. We try to get the same price for everything we do whether its shoveling salting or plowing. The way I see it I can find alot of guys to drive a nice warm plow truck, but it is more difficult to find someone reliable enough to snowblow and salt sidewalks. But honestly whithout seeing it I would have a tough time pricing it. Well I hope this helps. GL ;)
 

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I usually figure that an acre takes about an hour with an 8' blade in a fairly open lot. My figuring, if its just you, running (lets assume an 8' blade) your truck, it could take you about an hour and a half, but since there are cars, and islands etc, I would allow 2 hours, or at least bill that way. That's how I would bid it. I probably would not win the contract, due to the fact that I increase the rate/push based also on the 'obstacles' that are in the lot, and there are always people undercutting other guys prices, (read: Lowballers)

Just my $.02. and I usually don't bid large commercial lots, so it may not be up to correct 'standards'. I like smaller ones, that are easy, but still pay well. My largest commercial contract is about 48,000 sqft.
 

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From looking at your diagram, it does not appear that you would need to do much, if any backdragging at all, it should all be able to be PUSHED somewhere. If you have an 810, you should be considering more than $110 per hour due to the plow alones increased efficiency, I would venture a $150+ per hour rate, but then again I do not know the market in your area. I would think that you should be able to do that place in about an 1 1/2 hours with 1 truck (up to say 5"). Then add for walks and salting.
 

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That is a small commercial site. Considering that you would only be plowing the lanes most of the times, you are not looking at plowing the whole 58,000 sq ft. So theoretically, with that nice plow, you would be in & out of there with the plow truck in about an hour, give or take a little for how many cars get in the way while you're there. The problem I see is the designated snow pile loacations are set behind parking spaces. Will you be using a really big loader to put the snow over the cars that are parked there, or just crossing fingers that the correct spaces will be empty when you need to plow? Whoever designed that messed up bad, but good for the snowplow contractors ;) The fact that there is no place to put the snow adds a significant PIA fee to whatever price you come up with. Not to mention the PIA fee for apartments in general. Figure around 500 pounds of salt per application to get your price. Most times you will probably use less because you would only be hitting the lanes.
 

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I was thinking the same as BRL. If this is a high occupancy complex all of the snow pile areas will be blocked, or at best the cars that are there will be spaced out just enough so you will be trying to plow between cars. Which we all know it a major no no. Unless you do not mind taking claims for somones POS that they said you damamged.

You will most likely be just clearing lanes but even then where does the snow go?? Apartment complexs are just a huge PIA. I walk away from them when I do get a call to bid one. Along with town homes, or most anything managed by a committe. I service two churches and only do that because there is one person responsible for gounds maintenance.

Also who did come up with the diagram? If it was the client great, if it was you there might be a huge insurance risk when you can not get the snow to where you told the client you were going to put it. I always try to avoid telling the client where I am going to put snow. I direct them in where they might consdier, but always give them a choice of where I think would be best and then let them tell me where they would like the snow, and the contract verbage reflects the same.

This thread looks old so did you get the job, and have you plowed it yet?
 
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