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When away from vehicle, do you leave plow up or down?

  • I leave it up.

    Votes: 2 0.7%
  • I put it down.

    Votes: 251 90.0%
  • Sometimes up, sometimes down.

    Votes: 26 9.3%
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always down!

Always down for me , I have 3 boys ..3 , 6 and 11 and for thier safety and any other person the plows are always down . Accidents do happen . Safety first...:canada
 

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never trust the reliability of hydrolics they can fail;)
 

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On my plow if the actuator were to fail the plow would fly up not fall down. But even so I still run it down and apply enough down pressure to take the weight off the suspension and tires if sitting over night or longer.
In straight hydraulics leaving it up puts stress on the whole system. Besides the safety aspect of it. Just to easy to lower it why do anything else?

Bud
 

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Regarding the construction equipment, consider the fact that:

1. it is usually in a construction area (restricted)
2. The hydraulics are MUCH better, more expensive, and higher quality than what you get on snowplows.

The problem with snowplow hydraulics (aside from the terrible conditions they have to work under) is that they are cheap, cheap, cheap... That's OK as long as they work (some brands work better than others). But consider the fact that a priority flow regulator that controls a hydraulic hammer can cost almost as much as a whole snowplow ($3000). Its a whole different game.

Of course, better hydraulics aren't going to stop a rusty chain from snapping... :eek:
 

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up or down

Down and I'd agree with the guys who say it's not for anything about the truck or plow. Driving with the plow raised puts many many times the stress on the truck and plow than parking it in the raised position.
Like the guy who spoke of raising construction equipment on a job site said, it's all about risk. A necessary risk in many areas. Job sites are generally off limits to the public. Raising the stuff puts it out of reach of opportunists and also sends a signal, to those that might enter the site, that these guys take security of their equipment serously. I may be wrong but, I'd be willing to bet the first thing that is supposed to happen in the morning on one of these sights is the stuff comes down before anyone starts walking around, I said supposed to.
Anyway back to risk. While it is not necessary to lift a car in the air to work underneath it. Remember oil pits? The risk of having an oil pit deems them obsolete. Gas fumes collect in them, explosion/fire risk, and many people were injured or killed falling into them.
An auto lift has a mechanical safety device which is much more reliable than hoses and "O" rings. The safety device is not perfect which is why insurance regulations and sensible shop owners don't allow the general public near them. Your plow has no safety feature.
While it is not likely to fail when the truck is parked, a plow can fail at any time. It is probably most likely to fail at highway speeds going over a bump. That is a risk we all have to accept. You have to have a transport in the up position, unless you take it off and put it in your bed between stops. It does not need to be up when it's parked.
Some guys wrote of possible senarios to justify leaving the plow up. Here's mine for putting it down. You have a cable or hydraulic control plow ( I have one of each) and leave it up as a rule. You forget to lock your door and a couple of kids or your kids show up, what do you think could happen? Could you live with that. We're not talking of any kind of failure. No one to blame but yourself. I can come up with as many of these as there are senerarios to leave it up. It is possible, not likely, but possible for something to go wrong with an electric over hydraulic control on most modern systems as well. Chances are very very slim, but why take the risk. It takes such a small effort to push that down button or joy stick, why wouldn't you?

PS: Was that storm was worth waiting for or what?:D
 

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I'm pleased to see the numbers here supporting dropping the plow, I do it nearly 100% of the time.

I'm a bit surprised though that no one has mentioned a vital safety rule, NEVER put any part of your body under anything supported by hydraulics only. This rule is spelled out in any and every operators manual of equipment using hydraulics. Car lifts, jacks, heavy equipment, snowplows, the list goes on. There is always the chance of a failure in the hydraulic system, hence the provisions of safety devices like prop rods, jack stands and other implements.

At one of the local gravel banks several years ago, a mechanic was working under the boom of a wheel loader with no prop rod. Unfortunately a hose blew and the boom and bucket came down on the mechanic, killing him instantly. Though rare, accidents happen and are often disasterous.

Any snowplow manual will state "Always lower plow when unattended".
 

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Pelican story rings true, even for smaller equipment. A guy here at a local nursery was working on a leak in the loader of an old Deere tractor. As he tried to tighten the line while standing inside the loader arms, the line snap and the loader came down crushing him. He lived, but fractured his pelvis and can't walk or do much else.

He was either lazy or trying to save time and should have just lowered the arms. The loader may only weight a few hundred pounds (like a plow) but the concentrated force is severe. Think about what could happen to your toes with a cutting edge, even with steel toed boots.

Mods This is my seconde edit, after the first I got a double post. Please remove the first post of the two. Thanks.
 

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Always down, unless just running in to a shop or bank that has those darn small spots where there is barely room for even a Honda to park.
Other than that it's always down when parked.
 

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I'm hlad to hear all of you who say to leave them down. I always kind of thought also that when down the reservoir has more oil in it and less chance for condensation to build up.
I want to make an impression on customers and potential customers. If I left it up and a child played on or around or slipped under my equipment and got hurt, maimed or killed what kind of impression would that leave of my business.

Glad you Nor'Easter's got a good storm. Hope you all got through it safely.

Bruce
 

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Hi Guys & Gals
New guy here.
I'm a Plow downer when in park to.
Always have been, always will.
 

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Always down. I am a creature of habit, and somewhat anal too 1eye3 so when I learn something it is always in a certain pattern. When I get into a vehicle, as I put the key in the ignition I reach for the seatbelt. When I put the truck in park, I lower the blade. Good safety habits I guess. Here's another question . . . Do you shift first or lower your blade first? For example, pulling up to a garage door to back drag, do you drop the blade and then shift into reverse, or the other way around? And after the back drag, do you shift into forward and then raise the blade, or the opposite?
 

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Lower blade 1st then into reverse. I think i lift and then forward. I also sometimes like to drive and lift therefore there isnt as much load on the electrical system. Drive away lifting and then maybe drop & lift the blade a few times to get rid of the excess snow there might be on it.


Does it matter which you do first, is this a trick question?

I think a question you should ask is do you turn your blade while on the ground or in the air? Do you have your foot on the brake when you turn your steering wheel or do you do a dry grind? Do you drive with 2 feet (like my mom) or 1 ?


Dave.
 

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No trick queston. I think it is just a matter of habit and how one learns. Each person gets their own rythm with shifting and operating the blade. With back dragging, I drop the blade, then shift into reverse, back up, raise the blade, shift into forward. I don't know that it matters which order, but a consistent pattern will boost efficiency. Pushing into a pile, of course, I raise the blade as I am going into the pile, then shift into reverse to back up, drop the blade, then shift into forward.

As far as turning the blade in the air or on the ground, it depends on what I am plowing. I try to operate the blade angle and wings in the air as I am approaching the area, but will also angle on the ground while pushing to direct the snow where I want it to go.

And unless there is a clutch to operate, I drive one-footed. My grampa would rise up from his grave and get me if I ever put my left foot on the brake pedal! :nope
 

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down 99.8% of the time
 

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Do you shift first or lower your blade first? For example, pulling up to a garage door to back drag, do you drop the blade and then shift into reverse, or the other way around? And after the back drag, do you shift into forward and then raise the blade, or the opposite?

I just plow my own driveway....when I backdrag, I always put it into reverse first so that I don't forget to after I put the blade down (and the smack into the garage - already have enough nicks from trying to get real real close)
 

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seville009 said:
Do you shift first or lower your blade first? For example, pulling up to a garage door to back drag, do you drop the blade and then shift into reverse, or the other way around? And after the back drag, do you shift into forward and then raise the blade, or the opposite?

I just plow my own driveway....when I backdrag, I always put it into reverse first so that I don't forget to after I put the blade down (and the smack into the garage - already have enough nicks from trying to get real real close)
Same here, I just plow my driveway or my daughters moms driveway. I usually slip it into neutral as Im approaching the end of a direction of travel. Seems like it should make it easier on the transmission by giving it a short break between gears, and it makes for softer stops too. Then I shift, set the blade, and go. Mine takes about 3 seconds to raise or lower the blade, but its just a little personal plow. Sometimes I start the blade moving as Im nearing my start target, and it eases to the ground by the time I get where I want it. Or Ill go forward with the scraper blade down to scrape out my parking spot facing the house, raise it over the pile, then lower it, and stop in one fluid motion with the blade at the other side of the pile , then backdrag the scraped up pile.

As far as plow up or down, I almost always put it down when it is parked for any extended period. Ill leave it up if Im stopped for gas or something quick, but then Ill have the safety chain still on it anyway so it cant come down accidentally. I put a quick safety chain on it for highway travel. Do any of the normal truck plows have one? It seems like itd be quite a disaster if a hydraulic line blew or a solenoid shorted and it came down at highway speed, especially in the presence of expansion joints on the road.
 

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A local truck dealer here leaves them just off the ground to help prevent theft. Pretty hard to get a Minute Mount off a truck when it is hanging all the weight on the frame.
 

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Another way to look at the reason for lowering the plow is the electrical systems. As we all now, water and salt doesn't play well with electrical systems and I've learned that if something can go wrong, I usually does is the worst possible time.
 
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