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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a 1979 Chevy 1/2 ton 4x4 with a 4" suspension lift. I would like to put a plow on the truck for personal use( not commercial). I know that the mounting brackets will need to be modified, but are there any other problems that I should be aware of. Does anyone else have a lifted truck with plow that has any ideas. I haven't decided what type of plow to buy yet. I'm leaning toward a Boss 7 1/2' straight blade. Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks
 

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Welcome to the site.

If you go with the Boss plow I believe the mount needs to be about 15 1/2" from the ground. Also when you mount the plow you want to make sure the plows frame is parrallel to the ground.
With a 4 inch lift you are probably going to have to make some modificactions to the truck mount.
 

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I have an 85 K-10 with a 4" lift and a fisher. No mods here to the mounting system at all. I just use the third hole (top) where the pins mount for the plow. If you have over a 4" lift then you will require to do mods.
T.J.
www.tjsperformance.com
 

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Right now I am running 31 x 10.5's. In the spring I am putting a 14 bolt Full Floater rear and a Dana 44 or a 60(all from a 3/4 ton). Then I will run bigger tires. The weak link on half tons is the axles if you run large tires.
T.J.
 

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33's would be better than 35's but if ya can ya may wat to go a little smaller than those the bigger and wider the tire the better chance you have of riding ontop the snow which will cause slippage rather than cutting down in which is where your traction comes from...
 

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Another thing to take into consideration is that the larger tires usually will have a harder rubber compound that gets harder still in colder temps. This will affect your traction as well. My recomendation would be a second set of rims and snow tires. You can get some pretty tall and skinny snows- might have to jump into a 16" rim to try and keep some of the hieght. If you are going to be doing any commercial work- that is the best way to go.

Otherwise if this is for your own driveway and a couple of neighbors/friends, 33's would be better than the 35's. I believe Nate (Big Nates Plowing) runs some bigger tires on an old Bronco of his with no problems. I have 31x10.50's on my Blazer and it seems to be a good mix of float vs traction- I can climb curbs with no problems and dig in to move some snow with no problems too.

Let us know what you decide, and then how you make out- it's great to hear back on topics like this as to whether or not something works- great reference material for future searches!!

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all your help guys. I think I'm going to get the plow mounted and make any adjustments from there on. I'll let you know how I make out. By the way, Any opinions on the Boss or SnoWay plows?
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Chevyman,
Make sure you put a lot of weight in the bed of the truck, otherwise you will be hopping all over the place and that is bad for the rear gears. When you raise the plow, it naturally wants to lift the rear up. Load it up, don't be shy with the sand or whatever weight you use. You will be happy in the long run.
T.J.
 

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one other thing to watch for it ya set it up with the bigger tires first make sure to check your pushbeam height again if you put smaller tires on becuase it will change the height it sits at...
 
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