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I have installed a new concrete floor in my shop, and it is just about done its 30 day cure. I want to finish it with something that won't make it too slippery, but will make it look "pretty darn good", for lack of a better description. The traffic on it is just light vehicles, the backhoe and the toys with spark plugs.

Does anyone have a product to recommend? Thanks
 

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There is an epoxy coating that has grit in it, it's very durable, attractive and easy to clean. The grit can be added at different rates to give the desired amount of traction vs. ease of cleaning. We have it on our firehouse floor. Most times you need to get a company that specializes in the application
 

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If you do any welding avoid epoxy finishs. or leave a designated welding area unfinished.
 

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I would recomend a high end clear sealer with a silica sand type grit in it. Easiest to apply and easiest to maintain. I have done epoxy, and when done right its nice. But IMO, if you are wanting a fancy look, your better of for the money applying a colored stain with clear sealer over it. For your situation a high gloss clear sealer with grit will add some awsome shine and traction. You can do it yourself pretty easy, just where a respirator if your inside. AND most importantly - roll it on VERY evenly with a medium nap roller. I have seen where there has been inconsistencing in the way its applied, and it will usually show through.

There are lots of good products out there. Go to a local masonry tool/product supplier and ask for the highest quality & gloss sealer w/ grit they offer, and you should be good.
 

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Hi John I am a painting contractor in St.louis I have an epoxy floor in my garage the product I used was a Sherwinn Williams water based epoxy this was used because my floor had a slight moisture issue. I tested the floor by putting some plastic on a small section of the floor for a couple of days if you have a moisture issue it will be moist under the plastic. Sherwinn Willaims suggested this product because it would be more compatable for my situation.
I used a product called shark bite it looks like house hold table salt it is to be mixed in with the paint to provide traction, when it gets wet it is still slick and when you have snow on your shoes: look out! I have to say though, I would do this all over again. It sweeps and cleans up so much better than bare concrete, oil and other chemicals don't soak into the pores of the concrete. I had oil dripping on my floor for two or three days and took a paper towel and it wiped right up also it looks great. If you have any questions about prep I will be happy to give you some tips. The prep is 75% of the work and insures adheasion.
 

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Thanks for pull this thread up and the advice. I have not painted the floor yet, as the fall was wet and cool, and winter has been here for weeks now. It will get done next spring. It will have some oil and grease on it by then, and things in the way, but I want to do it anyway.
 

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I would recomend a high end clear sealer with a silica sand type grit in it. Easiest to apply and easiest to maintain. I have done epoxy, and when done right its nice. But IMO, if you are wanting a fancy look, your better of for the money applying a colored stain with clear sealer over it. For your situation a high gloss clear sealer with grit will add some awsome shine and traction. You can do it yourself pretty easy, just where a respirator if your inside. AND most importantly - roll it on VERY evenly with a medium nap roller. I have seen where there has been inconsistencing in the way its applied, and it will usually show through.

There are lots of good products out there. Go to a local masonry tool/product supplier and ask for the highest quality & gloss sealer w/ grit they offer, and you should be good.
I agree! If you want to get a little fancy saw cut 2'x2' lines in the floor before you stain and seal it, and it will give the apparence of tile. Go one more step, by some industrial grout, rubber float it into the saw cut joints and clean it with a sponge, just like grouting tile. ( do this after you stain it of course ) We do this in a lot of garages & basements .
LOOKS SWWEEETT!:nodd
GO TO www.brickform.com or www.butterfield.com tell me what ya think.
I'm sure between snowcrete & I ,we could coach you through somthing industructable and sweet looking all in one.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't use any paint or epoxy coating for anything other than a home garage that doesn't get floor jacks rolled over it on a regular basis and solvents dripped on it.

And I don't care for sealer on a garage floor even with the grit. Unless you don't mind re-applying it every couple years. Solvents (such as spilled gasoline) can soften areas.

For a shop floor I'd use just a floor hardener. Usually comes as a somewhat watery liquid that you just keep applying until the concrete refuses to absorb any more. Any spilled liquids will not absorb in because the pores of the concrete are filled and the material has a chemical reaction with the cement particles in the concrete, causing them to harden considerably. So when you drop a 1 5/16" wrench from the top of a truck box, it will probably not even scratch the floor. You'll still want to clean up spilled solvents in a timely manner, but IMHO, it's the best option for a floor that sees a lot of use and abuse. That is what most warehouses use on their floors.

Oh, yea, and you could do some polishing of the floor too.:wink
 

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You could do an abbreviated polish system is it is slick. If it is rough you have to grind it. If slick enough you could hit it with a 200 diamond then put a densifier/hardner on it. Hit with 400grit and put a stain guard impreginator and then buff with a hog hair pad. This could give you a clean look and provide some protection without the issue of a coating delaminating. I can get you more product/process details if you are interested.

Picture of a 200 grit
 

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You could do an abbreviated polish system is it is slick. If it is rough you have to grind it. If slick enough you could hit it with a 200 diamond then put a densifier/hardner on it. Hit with 400grit and put a stain guard impreginator and then buff with a hog hair pad. This could give you a clean look and provide some protection without the issue of a coating delaminating. I can get you more product/process details if you are interested.

Picture of a 200 grit
He may have gotten around to finishing it already in the last 11 years.
 
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