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I got my pallets of calcium/mag and straight mag yesterday. I read the mag bag and it had ratios to be sprayed as a dust control agent...what is the possibility/ procedure of making my own in maybe a barrel to pre-treat or treat walks with a 2- gallon pump tank sprayer. Please lend some info or experiences if you would. Thanks Kyle.:huh
 

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What is better to turn into a liquid, calcium chloride or Mag Chloride ?
I was thinking of doing a experament at my own house for the walkway. I thought of useing CaCl in a 2 gal pump sprayer. Mag is cheaper from what i have seen.
 

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Duh stupid me... I always thought calcium was better. Mag has a lower melting point you say ?

My dad works for one of the companys that makes calcium chloride i wonder if the sales guys know what the formula is.
 

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It sounds like it might be easier/more effective to just buy a barrel of pretreater than trying to concoct one... if it were that simple to make and have one work well it would seem their would be many more people doing it... but thats just my thoughts on the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah it probably isn't easy to make, if I buy pretreatment spray can you spray it with a regular pump tank sprayer or a 25 gal. plastic tank with electric motor?
 

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Snowboy said:
What is better to turn into a liquid, calcium chloride or Mag Chloride?
Thinking of HS Chemistry....
I'm not familiar at all with liquid de-icers/pretreaters, but is heating an option? If you could dump the NaCl or MgCl into (say) a 30 gallon drum and heat it with a turkey fryer or something.... it should dissolve into and saturate the water much quicker.
It does not need to be close to boiling or anything, but, if I recall correctly, the "rate of reaction" goes up exponentially (sp?) for every 10*.

Will look stupid, might be stupid, but it also might work..... Just a thought.

aleksei
 

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Indeed, when you heat a solution (water with MgCl), you will be able to dissolve more solute (MgCl) into the water. However, once it is saturated, when the temperature comes back down, the MgCl has no place to go, so the excess settles to the bottom. As long as you could hold it at a constant temp, it would work. We are sudying solutions right now in Chemistry, so I saw this and had to jump on it:)
 

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Well, building off of the HS Chemistry thing, we were actually talking about salt and its melting properties today. The way I understand it is that any melting agent melts ice by dissolving into the water, and raising its freezing temp. The more ions (charges) that you dissolve into the water, the lower the freezing temp is. Now, here is where regular salt, NaCl, Sodium, Na, has one + charge, and Chlorine, Cl, has one - charge, therefore it has 2 ions, or charges. Magnesium Chloride, however is one part Magnesium (Mg), and 2 parts Chlorine. When dissolved in water, there are 3 charges that are then dissolved, making a lower melting temp. Anyone, please correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought it was pretty interesting, and figured I'd post it, that way if a customer asks why Mag. Chlor. has more melting power than regular salt, you can really impress them:D
 

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I don't remember ever learning about why the different freezing points are what they are.... will pay more attention in class now! :rolleyes:
Also a good point about the saturation vs. temperature [smacks himself in the head] thing. Had I put more brainpower into the situation, I probably would have thought of it :D

aleksei
 

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The liquid you might be referring to is FreezeGard, it is composed of: 28% Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) solution (a salt), 5% PCI (an anti-corrosive agent) and 68% water.

Rick
 

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