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Discussion Starter #1
I'm making the change from sand/salt to straight salt and will be using Magic Salt for one site. I'm trying to calculate costs. In reading a report yesterday (I think it was from NY), I remember reading about salt coverage being 300 pounds per lane mile. In thinking about that later in relation to my situation where I'll be treating a parking area, that seems way low, considering a lane mile at 63,360 sq ft (5280'x12'). The area I'll be treating would be only about 10,000 sq ft. Am I missing something? Also, since I don't plan to use the spreader anymore, I'm not offering sanding or salting of large areas. There is mostly gravel in this area, so could I use the Magic Salt as a deicer on any lots I may get that want sand?
 

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dssxxxx said:
We kind of use a rule of thumb of 10 lbs. per 100 square ft.
Are you sure you don't mean 10 lbs/1,000sf? At 10lb/100sf you're talking 4300 lbs per acre which is about 4 times what I would consider a maximum and I'm in a colder climate than you are.

I'm no tree hugger but some of the salt quantities I see discussed are bordering on environmentally irresponsible. Except for a short time in late January/early February, when surface temperatures are at their lowest, I had five sites that probably totaled close to four acres and I could anti-ice them with 2500 lbs, plow once, and not need a second application if we got sunshine following the storm.

Big variable is how much traffic there is to move the material around the site. If have to do a site that is closed on a weekend it takes more material to melt it off, just laying there, than it does when traffic is constantly mixing and moving the slush around.

Since most of my stuff is close to home I was ableto play wiht light amounts and go with a second application if it didn't work the first time. I found it's pretty amazing how little salt is needed to get results.
 

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****,

As for salt in place of sand on gravel it works after a fashion butit's not the way to go. Salt, applied on pavement, drills down through the pack and creates a brine layer that will seperate the pack from the pavement. On gravel, instead of the brine spreading horizontally, it simply sinks into the surface. I've done it where there was going to be nothing but truck traffic and the softened gravel would get mixed with the pack and gave fairly good traction, IF it wasn't too cold (above 20). When it got really cold or if the pack was thick all the salt did was drill holes. Gravel lots are the one time that the use of sand, instead of salt, is justified.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, Alan. Yeah, I'm trying to figure this out and having quite a time. He's showing 1 lb per 10 sq ft; you're showing 1 lb per 100 sq ft and that study worked out to 1 lb per 211 sq ft.

Quite a range. I'm assuming it would take at least double for deicing as anti-icing for any given set of variables. I'm also thinking I might want to throw some sand in the mix where I de-ice a gravel parking lot that wouldn't get much traffic. I tried treating sand with Magic -0 a few years ago. Didn't seem to work so well, but I might try that again. The best part I remember is that it kept the sand from clumping.
 

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Are you Sure?

Hi ****
I think the report you were speaking of calls out for 300 lbs per 2 lane mile. If it is the one from the salt institute that I have seen it calls out 300-800lbs per two lane mile which is based on temperatures and would in effect double the coverage you are speaking of. That number does have to be tempered a bit because it is from the salt institute and they would like to see more product sold i am sure.

I typicaly spread at a rate of about 3/4 ton per acre (again depending on temps) when it is about 20-23 surface and air temp. If you are using Magic Salt you can reduce by about 1/3 to start and then probably 1/2 after you get your spreader set for the most efficient quantity without over salting.

Once you find the setting for your spreader I am pretty confident that you will not increase your costs very much if using bulk magic salt. Your costs will be slightly higher, maybe 20% if using bagged magic salt but you will recover some of those costs with reduced revisits or minimal applications upon revisit.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you very much. I make my own Magic Salt from bagged rock salt I buy by the skid and Magic -0, so my costs are even less than "bulk Magic".
 

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Discussion Starter #11
CGSI said:
Hi ****
I think the report you were speaking of calls out for 300 lbs per 2 lane mile. If it is the one from the salt institute that I have seen it calls out 300-800lbs per two lane mile which is based on temperatures and would in effect double the coverage you are speaking of. That number does have to be tempered a bit because it is from the salt institute and they would like to see more product sold i am sure.
In case anyone is interested, this report was from the University of New Hampshire:

http://www.t2.unh.edu/fall01/pg6-7.html

and you were right, it was based on road mile.
 

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I make my own magic salt too. For sidewalks we only use about 20kg/kilometer of sidewalk, that about a 250lb/acre for you non-metric guys, with excellent results. In parking lots we're using about double that or about 500lb/acre. to next bare/black pavement. The best part about magic and caliber is that the liquid stays on the lots, as long as long as you don't get a rain. Most lots though we will really do 1000lb /acre because we'll pretreat before or at the beginning of the strom and after plowing. I know that some guys using straight salt are spreading 4 times that.

Bill
 
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