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Anyone in the salem NH/Merrimack Valley area do flooring..i'm thinking about having my 12x20 kitchen floor done with that lockable laminate i saw at Lowes...Also would like a 7-8 foot of carpet area opening stretched and a new mould where it meets the kitchen (betewwn the kitcn and lvng rm its shreaded a little)Thanks
 

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I'm not up that way I used to install alot of that pergo and to this day scratch my head why any one would want it. I would not put that stuff in my own house and I can get it wholsale . That stuff is basicly formica put on the floor. It will scratch and just think how will you repair it when someone drops a can, knife or what ever and puts a hole in it?
 

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I wouldn't recommend laminate flooring in a potentially wet area like a kitchen, although, that's what I have in mine. (Wouldn't do it again) It was higher end Pergo, installed 10 years ago, and it has been fine, but it was the glue together type (big pain). Had it in an entry, that didn't fair so well, again due to moisture.

The newer click together stuff is a breeze to install, goes fast, but I don't think the joints are as tight as my glued joints, I was meticulous about clamping during installation and glue set time.
 

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I wouldn't recommend laminate flooring in a potentially wet area like a kitchen, although, that's what I have in mine. (Wouldn't do it again) It was higher end Pergo, installed 10 years ago, and it has been fine, but it was the glue together type (big pain). Had it in an entry, that didn't fair so well, again due to moisture.

The newer click together stuff is a breeze to install, goes fast, but I don't think the joints are as tight as my glued joints, I was meticulous about clamping during installation and glue set time.
I second that in not recommending it. I have owned my own contracting business for 14 yrs in May. I have seen so many problems with floating floors I won't even let my customers use it in the project.
 

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There is a flooring store next to me. I get a lot of old samples and use them for shelves, etc. They sell the laminate, because it is what people want, but they also sell good old fashioned hardwood too. Interesting thing I saw on one line of the samples is that they come pre-glued. You just wipe the edges with a wet rag and slap them together.

My whole house is original 1932 5/4" oak. :D When I took up the sub floor in the kitchen, I found it in there too. Had 1000's of nail holes in it, but it was there. Even found a spot that was the ash chute to the basement that they filled in when they got rid of the wood cooking stove :D

If I was going to do my kitchen floor, I like this new vinyl tile they have next door. Looks like ceramic, and you can even space it and grout it. They are thick! Of course I have no say in what goes on the kitchen floor though....:wink

~Chuck
 

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There is a flooring store next to me. I get a lot of old samples and use them for shelves, etc. They sell the laminate, because it is what people want, but they also sell good old fashioned hardwood too. Interesting thing I saw on one line of the samples is that they come pre-glued. You just wipe the edges with a wet rag and slap them together.

My whole house is original 1932 5/4" oak. :D When I took up the sub floor in the kitchen, I found it in there too. Had 1000's of nail holes in it, but it was there. Even found a spot that was the ash chute to the basement that they filled in when they got rid of the wood cooking stove :D

If I was going to do my kitchen floor, I like this new vinyl tile they have next door. Looks like ceramic, and you can even space it and grout it. They are thick! Of course I have no say in what goes on the kitchen floor though....:wink

~Chuck
That 5/4" would be so cool refinished if you haven't already done that. I would do porcelain tiles if I was redoing a kitchen floor not that I don't have a love for wood. I do a lot of custom built-ins in the houses that I build and you just really can't beat it. The nice thing about TRUE sand and finish on site wood floors is in 15 yrs when they start looking bad all you have to do is re-sand and finish for a few hundred bucks. It will look just the same as the first day you put it down. The drawback to wood floors is the finish doesn't handle 80# weimaraners power sliding with their claws dug in to the back door. This is speaking from experience! That is why my next house will have tile through out the main floor other than bedrooms.
 

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I third the dumping Purgo, between kids and dogs and a lazy:witch it went to hell quicker than a good plan. I have learned even with my rentals to break down and do Ceramic easy to clean and its bullet proof.

I dont know how much stuff i threw out last year from years of being a landlord and fixing renters wrecks Ceramic cost more forsure but when done its done , nothing funnier than a 60lb lab shooting across the floor they learn in a hurry to walk not run on ceramic.:wink
 

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Chuck you must be talking about Congoleums duracermic they have both a goutable one and non in the vinyl, there are some vinyls that look just like ceramic I sell the karden ,congoleum can get others . nothing will replace real wood and ceramic in my opinion, we just did vct in one of our apts in a checkerbord patern will be pretty tough 1/8 " commercial grade . You can still get the old fashion lino called marmoleum comes in 6' sheets and you can get some in 12x12 tiles not a maintence free floor but but very nice looking too .
I never liked the pergo and the 50 other ones that are on the market they talked the talk when they pushed them out but when you asked then certain questions on it they have no clue I would ask at the trade show in Vegas and get the look like why did he ask that question , with still no good response to my question .
 

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Not to mention, Pergo does nothing for resale value... Wife and I are in the process of selling our house and looking for something bigger, and a lot of the houses we're looking at have pergo installed since new. Most of these were built since '01... One house we looked at the whole main level was done in Pergo, what a turn-off! :nope

In our entryway at the old house, we needed to cover up the original 60's linoleum, and I used the 12"x12" self adhesive linoleum tiles, with real adhesive put down first. The stuff is cheap as heck and looks really nice. I wouldn't do a whole kitchen with it, but for the 4'x4' entry it worked out good.
 

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when we first moved into our house 4 years ago. we ripped out the old hard 9" square tiles and put down a mannington floating floor but the kitchen is very small and it's held up really nice. i have only done a few on jobs. i knew it wasn't going to be forever and didn't want to spend a lot on tile that would someday not be a kitchen or get remodeled.

I would put tile in there. although its hard on your feet/legs/back if standing for a long time, nothing a few small rugs wouldn't solve.

we've done a lot of hardwood, prefinished and unfinished in kitchens as well. they seem to hold up. brazilian cherry or mahogany holds up well in wetter areas. not that a kitchen is really an area where you a slopping water all over.
 

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I agree I think if I was looking at new houses and saw that stuff down it would not make me as interested in spending alot of money for the house. Alot of people think this is the greates thing in the world.I also don't like the peel and stick for the same reason very cheap they shrink and discolor and just don't hold up as pur vinyl tiles that cost more.



Not to mention, Pergo does nothing for resale value... Wife and I are in the process of selling our house and looking for something bigger, and a lot of the houses we're looking at have pergo installed since new. Most of these were built since '01... One house we looked at the whole main level was done in Pergo, what a turn-off! :nope

In our entryway at the old house, we needed to cover up the original 60's linoleum, and I used the 12"x12" self adhesive linoleum tiles, with real adhesive put down first. The stuff is cheap as heck and looks really nice. I wouldn't do a whole kitchen with it, but for the 4'x4' entry it worked out good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
The stuff i looked at was at lowes and was made by dupont and lock together and look like travertine, they come in 12 x 46 inch sheets and their are 5 sheets in a box..I need around 42 sheets..I dont want wood or pergo flooring in the kitchen...Maybe someone that does linoleum also?....and not the squares
 

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Mike the pergo name is like bobcat is to skid steers basicly same stuff as the what you have on your counter if it is laminate. The reason for the creation of this stuff in my opinion was to get away from doing majore prep to the floor, but it still as tolerences to being put on a flat sub floor. You mentioned sheet goods I sell congoleum If you want a nice quality look at the ultima .as far as armstrong or maniningtion don't deal with them If any one rememberd manington gold parimeter flooring ,as a matter a fact there is no more parimeter flooring being sold anymore another no prep type of flooring. but any sheet good flooring will need a good sub floor.
 

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There is a flooring store next to me. I get a lot of old samples and use them for shelves, etc. They sell the laminate, because it is what people want, but they also sell good old fashioned hardwood too. Interesting thing I saw on one line of the samples is that they come pre-glued. You just wipe the edges with a wet rag and slap them together.

My whole house is original 1932 5/4" oak. :D When I took up the sub floor in the kitchen, I found it in there too. Had 1000's of nail holes in it, but it was there. Even found a spot that was the ash chute to the basement that they filled in when they got rid of the wood cooking stove :D

If I was going to do my kitchen floor, I like this new vinyl tile they have next door. Looks like ceramic, and you can even space it and grout it. They are thick! Of course I have no say in what goes on the kitchen floor though....:wink
commercial kitchen flooring
~Chuck
Hello Everyone,
We are in the process of having a new kitchen installed and I think I made a big mistake of not removing the old vinyl flooring b4 fixing the new kitchen cabinets. The new cabinets are a different size from the old ones and so the installer just put some material on the lower end where there was no vinyl flooring to level the floor. Now we have a few problems. I want a new vinyl floor. I can't figure out how it's going to be installed without removing the existing ones. Any advice would be very helpful
Thanks in Advance
 
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