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Discussion Starter #1
I'm installing some new shoes on my snow plow to use on concrete parking lot and sidewalks. I was wondering if anyone has tried adding stiff spring to shaft of the shoe skids to help support blade and still allow it to scrape surfaces? Didn't know if this idea would work or if anyone has tried.
 

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I'm not sure I'm following the question - what exactly are you trying to achieve with springs? I don't understand "support the blade."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My thought is to put a compression spring on the shaft of a shoe to have downward pressure on the shoe in turn taking some of the weight off the cutting edge of the blade resting on the concrete. I think I want shoes on the blade but I don't want to leave 1/4" of snow on the concrete after plowing. My thought is getting some of the weight lifted off the cutting edge (by using downward force from springs) to lesson damage on transitions of concrete but still allowing blade to rest on concrete...
 

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You can adjust the shoes by the washers, if you start with the blade touching first, then the blade will wear and the shoes and blade will be all the same height.
 

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My thought is to put a compression spring on the shaft of a shoe to have downward pressure on the shoe in turn taking some of the weight off the cutting edge of the blade resting on the concrete. I think I want shoes on the blade but I don't want to leave 1/4" of snow on the concrete after plowing. My thought is getting some of the weight lifted off the cutting edge (by using downward force from springs) to lesson damage on transitions of concrete but still allowing blade to rest on concrete...
I think I follow your train of thought but the idea of the shoes is to prevent the blade from hitting the surface. Putting springs on there will achieve one of two things:

A) you adjust them so there is a huge amount of clearance for the blade, thereby leaving massive amounts of snow any time the plow is not bouncing on the springs

B) you adjust them so the blade is just off the ground, or barely touching (as it would be with washers) and it works fine until you hit a bump at which time the spring compresses and results in the blade crashing into whatever surface you didnt want the blade to crash into in the first place
 
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