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Seeing as I’m tossing such big lures out into the pond today ,..I might as will toss another one out there,


I’m standing here looking at my plow truck and I’m not seeing a 25 foot mast sticking up in the air so I’m confused , does your truck have one ?
what I would need ballast for ?
Also, I don’t want to sit lower , into the ground for more stability .

I like to keep my trucks out of the pond..
And on top of the dirt
 

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You’re probably a picture kind of kid ,so I’m gonna post a couple pictures that explain counterweight how the fulcrum works When applied to a vehicle and would you please point out ballast in any of them
What the **** do you think ballast does in a ship then?
 

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What the **** do you think ballast does in a ship then?
Please try to follow along .
I’ve already shown and explained what
Ballast is.
I’m sorry you’re reading your comprehension skills are so limited.

Q is your truck a boat?

I believe we’re talking about a motorized vehicle called a pick up truck .

I’m not putting a mast on it nor do I have to stabilize it By having it sit lower in the water .

He hung a heavy object on the front , ie a plow ,much like the forklift that has a heavy load on the forks .
to counter act the force I’m going to use a counter weight as explained by using simple English , pictures and basic physics.

Capeesh ?
 

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Maybe this is where you’re stumbling
A boat doesn’t have a fulcrum as It’s surrounded by water
A boat uses ballast to lower it in the water to stabilize it /To limit rocking

Your truck on the other hand has a Fixed fulcrum an arm ( the frame) just like in the pictures and diagrams above.
And like what is represented you would use a counterweight.
Capeesh
 

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Maybe this is where you’re stumbling
A boat doesn’t have a fulcrum as It’s surrounded by water
A boat uses ballast to lower it in the water to stabilize it /To limit rocking

Your truck on the other hand has a Fixed fulcrum an arm ( the frame) just like in the pictures and diagrams above.
And like what is represented you would use a counterweight.
Capeesh
Thank god you are not a naval architect... but what do you think that hull does relative to x and y axises of the ship? Why do you think superliners are not as stable as lower ships in the sea? Please tell me that you really aren’t this inept?
 

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naval architect I suppose you are one ....
you seem to lack the ability to answer any of my questions leads me to believe you don't know.
Show me fulcrum.

A boat can rotate around 3 axis's at once , please show me the fulcrum.

Rotational motions

The vertical/Z axis, or yaw axis, is an imaginary line running vertically through the ship and through its center of gravity. A yaw motion is a side-to side movement of the bow and stern of the ship.

The transverse/Y axis, lateral axis, or pitch axis is an imaginary line running horizontally across the ship and through the center of gravity. A pitch motion is an up-or-down movement of the bow and stern of the ship.

The longitudinal/X axis, or roll axis, is an imaginary line running horizontally through the length of the ship, through its center of gravity, and parallel to the waterline. A roll motion is a side-to-side or port-starboard tilting motion of the superstructure around this axis.

Then....
Transnational motion
Heave
The linear vertical (up/down) motion; excessive downward heave can swamp a ship.
Sway
The linear transverse (side-to-side or port-starboard) motion. This motion is generated directly either by the water and wind currents exerting forces against the hull or by the ship's own propulsion; or indirectly by the inertia of the ship while turning. This movement can be compared to the vessel's drift from its course.
Surge
The linear longitudinal (front/back or bow/stern) motion imparted by maritime conditions.

Educate me show me the fulcrum.
Im also curious as to how the ship would sit on one and still float?
 

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naval architect I suppose you are one ....
you seem to lack the ability to answer any of my questions leads me to believe you don't know.
Show me fulcrum.

A boat can rotate around 3 axis's at once , please show me the fulcrum.

Rotational motions

The vertical/Z axis, or yaw axis, is an imaginary line running vertically through the ship and through its center of gravity. A yaw motion is a side-to side movement of the bow and stern of the ship.

The transverse/Y axis, lateral axis, or pitch axis is an imaginary line running horizontally across the ship and through the center of gravity. A pitch motion is an up-or-down movement of the bow and stern of the ship.

The longitudinal/X axis, or roll axis, is an imaginary line running horizontally through the length of the ship, through its center of gravity, and parallel to the waterline. A roll motion is a side-to-side or port-starboard tilting motion of the superstructure around this axis.

Then....
Transnational motion
Heave
The linear vertical (up/down) motion; excessive downward heave can swamp a ship.
Sway
The linear transverse (side-to-side or port-starboard) motion. This motion is generated directly either by the water and wind currents exerting forces against the hull or by the ship's own propulsion; or indirectly by the inertia of the ship while turning. This movement can be compared to the vessel's drift from its course.
Surge
The linear longitudinal (front/back or bow/stern) motion imparted by maritime conditions.

Educate me show me the fulcrum.
Im also curious as to how the ship would sit on one and still float?

Explain to me why then ships are sometimes known to break up when they sink?
 

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You can say anything you want, it doesn’t make you right.
There isn’t a fulcrum on a boat
I have proven this.

You need to show proof otherwise.
Saying I’m wrong ,proves that you don’t know


I can show you where they use
Counterweight then in the next sentence that call it ballast, manuals written for people with a4th
Grade education.
Manuals are known to be wrong.
Counter weight counters the weight of the plow and goes behind the rear axle. The rear axle acts like a fulcrum.

Ballast goes in front of the rear wheals and adds weight to both front and rear.

We know manuals are wrong .
Here is boss’s
“Ballast is primarily added whenever you desire to take weight off of the front of your truck. Ballast is also used to add traction and may be required to be used with certain plows due to their weight.”
“Where To Use Ballast
It is important that the ballast weight be placed behind the rear axle, as far to the rear of the truck bed as possible. In this location, the rear axle acts as the fulcrum taking weight off of the front axle. Any additional weight placed in front of the rear axle actually adds weight to the front axle and may exceed the FGAWR of the vehicle.”

We know they used the word ballasts wrong
As this is the definition of a counterweight
As per Webster and everyone else.

But we know this is the wrong use of ballast.
because
We have looked up the definitions.
(Poster earlier )


https://simpletractors.com/forums/topic/20337-rear-counterweight-for-snow-plow/

https://www.globalindustrial.com/p/outdoor-grounds-maintenance/snow-removal/snow-plows-pushers/optional-counterweight-balance-for-fork-truck-snow-plow
 

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hmmm so there isn't a fulcrum...

A yacht at an angle of heel

Let's consider a boat at rest, sitting level in calm water. The boat's mass is centred on a point G, the centre of gravity, and we can think of the force of gravity as acting straight down through this point. The centroid of the boat's underwater volume is called B, the centre of buoyancy. The force of buoyancy is directed straight up through this point.

We now heel the boat over by an angle "phi". Point G doesn't move, but point B does: by heeling the boat, we've lifted her windward side out of the water and immersed her leeward side. The centre of buoyancy, B, therefore shifts to leeward.

The force of buoyancy, acting upward through B, is now offset from the force of gravity, acting downward through G. The perpendicular distance between these two forces, which by convention we call GZ, can be thought of as the length of the lever that the buoyancy force is using to try to bring the boat upright. GZ is the "righting arm".

If we draw a line straight upward from B, it will intersect the ship's centreline at a point called M, known as the "metacentre". (Strictly speaking, the term "metacentre" applies only when phi is very tiny, but a pseudo-metacentre exists at any given angle of heel.) The metacentric height is a useful quantity to know when calculating changes in trim and heel
 

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You do realize the fulcrum point is just a point you pivot a lever around... now go look at your examples again. This time notice where the CG is effort and load...
Yes .
But There isn’t a lever.

It’s the water that maintains Stability.

The pivot point or the center of gravity is in constant flux on a boat , unlike a wheel Of a truck that is placed on firm ground to which a leaver ( the frame) can pivot around ,as shown in the diagrams


I’ve already proven My point

you need to go back and sue your teacher(s)
 
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