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Discussion Starter #1
Just purchased windows 7 ultimate full, not system builders or upgrade as I understand it. $179. I don't think it will last, probably MS wants to say "x number were sold in the first week/month!

If it is as represented, a very good price (I think regular price is $319). If it turns out to be something less than advertised I can still use it. I'd like to play with it a bit, then install it on something. Ordered it from:

http://www.jigantic.com/SearchResults.asp
 

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No, it was advertised as a full version. I get the New Egg adds daily, like the company very much. OEM versions are always cheaper. Builder is responsible for all support, saves MS money. We'll see what I get. If it is a system builder version, I think I'll be OK with it, but would prefer the full version. I think the rules are fairly liberal, replace a hard drive and some memory - which I always do - and I think you'll get a pass. (If you replace too many things, your original license will be dropped! Robot thinks you have a different machine.) The main thing is you can not move a builder model to another machine, which I'd like the freedom to do. Test it out, then if I want, get the perfect build for the OS and move it over. I think there is a good chance that MS wants to have big numbers in the first week, to create some momentum and acceptance. Hey, it works for me! Years from now the price will come down, but I want to try it out now.

When you buy a machine with an OS, it is always locked to that machine. This is troublesome when you toss the machine, but want to migrate the OS over to a new machine and use it as a virtual machine for the old programs. Apparently, with Pro or Ultimate 7 you can download a free legal copy of XP to use in a virtual machine. Two for the price of one. Warning, playing music on the virtual machine gives low quality sound, and things move slowly in general. I've been using virtual machines since I got my first computer.

Microsoft (MS) is making it safer for a business with an older program that only runs in XP. For free you can still use that program in an XP window, while running 7 for all modern programs.
 

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Star

Looking foward to what i know will be a honest review from you. Vista would not work for us with so much of our Auto repair software on XP OS , I bought a Gateway from best buys for the shop when it first came out and was so frustrated with it i took the 30 day free return policy they have and returned it.

I have had a local shop build two Noblis PC's since with XP loaded hes no longer doing this. The Gateway iam typing on now is a awesome pc however was the last one aval with XP and i just know at some point its gonna crap out here at the house office iam thinking i bought it in 05.

I posted this in off topics but i just bought a Netbook from Verizon its a gateway with XP loaded which seemed wierd but i was glad short of not having a Dvd drive this little laptop is awesome and cost 129 bucks on a Verizon promo.

Again interested how the new OS works out. On another note my mom recently moved into a house i had bought for my daugter anyway mom not being real pc savy managed to rip the VGA and rear plate out of a Compac pc she had she didnt understand the thumb screws have to be screwed out first:D we went to best buys hoping to find her something they had maybe 7 pc's left total since everyone is waiting for the new pcs to debute with the new system.
 

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Sooner or later they are going to have to make that auto repair software compatible with a new OS. XP will not be supported, meaning security holes will not be plugged, and you risk losing your business computer to criminals.

I'm pleased with the concept of offering a virtual window for XP, with the XP license thrown in for free - NOT available in "home premium". I think there is at least a bit less risk running XP in a virtual machine. It looks like a real machine and if it gets polluted, the whole virtual machine can be simply deleted. I've read that's how they test for dangerous sites on the web, getting malware and simply deleting the virtual machine. I suppose with the new readily available and widespread use of virtual machines hackers will learn to cross over the boundary. I've run virtual machines on a thumb drive, but that slows it even more. Makes it possible to move it between computers. Makes it easy to get rid of it too.

I don't know about my review, I seem to like fooling with computers and have liked almost every OS I've tried, just some are more useful than others. In the end, I use windows because I need Quickbooks.

$129, that sounds great! We don't have verizon here, or any big name or good deal. No internet for $9.99, we get it for something like $70? a month.
 

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The netbook itself was 129 the broadband which i already had or 3g has they call it is 59 bucks a month for 250mb i belive however with the built in connection manager you can hit the toggle and jump to a wi fi connection in seconds, so using it here or at the shop or on buss or worse yet in the hosptial i just run off the wifi.

Has for internet service i havent seen 995 since i bought a massive amount of stock in aol watched it split 4 times, then Time Warner bought them out and i dumped every last share...:wink

My DSL is something around 45 a month threw SBC.
 

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I have a desktop and laptop with Vista . I do run 3 party software and its all good . Want to update to 7 .

One of those auto software companies needs to blink first and the others will fall into line . Its probably expensive to make compatiable to new OSs But why screw around with your customers?.
 

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Sooner or later they are going to have to make that auto repair software compatible with a new OS. XP will not be supported, meaning security holes will not be plugged, and you risk losing your business computer to criminals.


Haha thats funny.. we have stuff running in DOS! I have a stack of Windows 95 machines sitting around for when one breaks..

The telecom industry has not updated software as needed... We are still managing hardware with DOS, hyperterminal and having to slow the clock speed down on some applications..

What a PIA..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Haha thats funny.. we have stuff running in DOS! I have a stack of Windows 95 machines sitting around for when one breaks..

The telecom industry has not updated software as needed... We are still managing hardware with DOS, hyperterminal and having to slow the clock speed down on some applications..

What a PIA..
Sounds horrible, the local gas and oil company still uses DOS last I knew. Of course, criminals go where the money is, which means numbers. That type of crime came after DOS, and they won't bother with it. Same reason both Apple and Linux were ignored until recently, too small a market share. I've been using 64bit operating systems for years, I used to have to belong to a group that shared where to find 64 bit drivers. There was little crime in 64 bit machines, not enough of them around.

The idea that windows is inherently vulnerable isn't right, it's the fact that criminals focus all their energy where the greatest potential lies.

Since XP is so widespread, it will continue to be attacked for years to come. There may even be a resurgence when development is dropped, because millions will still be using it and security openings will be permanent. Remember, you don't have to control a lot of money with your machine, you may have none. They will still break through and control your machine and sell it as part of a system of robots ("bot" in the lingo, and "botnet" - robot network).
 

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I have a desktop and laptop with Vista . I do run 3 party software and its all good . Want to update to 7 .

One of those auto software companies needs to blink first and the others will fall into line . Its probably expensive to make compatiable to new OSs But why screw around with your customers?.
Bill

I do belive it got cold in hell last night..:wink:D I agree 100 percent with you, and the burden with having even GM, stilling running there Tis and Si on Xp along with Mitchell, and Alldata, not to mention even my Napa Autocare software cont's to force my hand at having machines built with XP. Even Dell which offered XP on a build i belive has stopped now, which surprized me when the Netbook came with XP is it poss that Verizions connection manager cant run on the newer OS i bet it is.

Again i would love to try the later "Fixed" versions of Vista and now 7 but when your whole shop and buss is depending on XP its hard to justify buying one machine to just try it out for even just personal use.
 

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Been running Windows 7 64x Ultimate, for the last 3 months. Very user friendly and alot faster than Vista. All my programs and hardware worked, with exception of my printer, at first.
If you have issues installing anything change compatiblity to Vista Service Pack 2 and then install.
 

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I've always considered myself kind of smart but i don't have a clue what you guys are talking about:eek:I can weld and fix plows but this thread may as well be in chinese for me:D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've always considered myself kind of smart but i don't have a clue what you guys are talking about:eek:I can weld and fix plows but this thread may as well be in chinese for me:D
One of my biggest failings in life is not knowing how to weld. Trade ya!

I'll try to explain it all. While drinking Crown Royal. :eek:



64 bit operating systems:

64 bit is the number of digits available. "$10" has two digits. "$1000" has four digits, but it's not twice as much, even though it has only twice the number of digits (bits). On a computer, it's electricity. So the easiest choice is on or off, symbolized by a "1" - for on, or a "0" - for off. So, computers use "binary". Instead of each new column being ten times as much, as in $1, or $10, each column is twice as much. Binary. "Digital" as it's called now.

"1" is still one in binary, but "10" means (in binary) zero in the ones column, and one in the twos column. So 10 in binary is just a 2 in base 10, which we use because we have ten fingers to count on. Electricity only has two "fingers" to count on, "on", and "off". You can use any number as your base, some use 16 (hexadecimal) so the first column is one, and the next column is 16 times as much.

Anyway, by using 64 bits, more information can be carried with each number, and far more memory can be addressed. 32 bit operating systems (pretty much the standard) simply cannot address more than 3 and a little more Gigabytes of RAM. The machine I'm using now has 8 GB of RAM, and it's all being used. If I ran a 32 bit OS on this machine, 5 GB would be doing absolutely nothing.



Virtual Machine:

Not sure I can define this very easily, even though I've used them for years. Think of it as a program that runs as though it was a totally different computer. It can run a totally different operating system (OS), it boots up, you can load programs, it has a desktop, it does everything like a computer, but it is running a further step removed from the actual hardware. Because it exists as a file it can be deleted, then it ceases to exist. Virtual XP is indistinguishable on the screen from XP being run directly, and all the functions are the same, but a bit slower because of the extra computing involved.

There are several ways to go about it, so there are more than one style of virtual machine, virtual, para virtual, etc.

It's actually a bit easy for a computer, since in effect the main OS is almost a virtual machine, it doesn't talk directly to the hardware, it talks to the "Hardware Abstraction Layer" (acronym, "HAL", ................yes that is where the movie 2001 got the name of Hal who controlled the computer, a good insider joke).

The drivers interpret between the HAL and the physical hardware of the machine, allowing the identical OS to run on many different types of hardware if the drivers are available. Thus the occasional problem finding drivers, which the hardware manufactures must come up with, in 32 or 64 bit, and for each OS's HAL.



DOS:

DOS is just an older and non graphic OS, done in text only. The graphics we are used to (pictures) are just pointers to a sort of DOS or command line text commands, still running in the background. And those commands are just pointers to a deeper level, each command is a small program running at a deeper level. At the bottom, below hexadecimal, is good old binary, just zeros and ones, on and off, machine language, where it all really takes place.



Older Automotive and other programs:

Since each OS rests on a framework of machine language, and many arbitrary decisions were made by the programmers who "compiled" the code, any third party who writes a program must compile it to fit the framework of the OS that the program will run on. Out dated programs are usually not bothered with, so it seems the auto industry is declaring their own programs to be outdated.

They will have to either give up, write new programs, or recompile their programs to fit the new OS, and debug them.



Did I leave anything out?? :grinz

Now you explain welding!
 

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Ok Star. We're all gonna have to sit down with a bottle of Crown in order for us to be able to properly process that.:wink
 

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Ok Star. We're all gonna have to sit down with a bottle of Crown in order for us to be able to properly process that.:wink
Wow,I thought i was confused before:scramble LOL! Thanks for trying!If you come here i'll just show you how to weld:D
 

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Sooner or later they are going to have to make that auto repair software compatible with a new OS. XP will not be supported, meaning security holes will not be plugged, and you risk losing your business computer to criminals.
Not always true. I have several business clients who are running XP,
one of them being an auto repair shop, and a couple who are still running 98 2nd edition. I've always stressed to my customers, if it works for what the person needs it to do, there is no reason to change.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Originally Posted by stargazer
Sooner or later they are going to have to make that auto repair software compatible with a new OS.
Not always true. I have several business clients who are running XP,
one of them being an auto repair shop, and a couple who are still running 98 2nd edition. I've always stressed to my customers, if it works for what the person needs it to do, there is no reason to change.


Since XP is so widespread, it will continue to be attacked for years to come. There may even be a resurgence when development is dropped, because millions will still be using it
"Sooner or later", not now.

Window 98 was before the serious and prevalent attacks we have now, no one will bother to develop new attacks for it. Just like using DOS, it's way too small. You are updating to stop new attacks. DOS would be safer. Have you checked to make sure that the W98 machines are not "bots" before you brag about them?

I will never "get a mac", hate them. Big ripoff $, totally proprietary. Makes MicroSoft look like open source. They are not safer, just less profitable to attack because such a small part of the economy. They are being attacked more often, however. Vulnerabilities are discovered in Macs regularly. There is no magic system, not mac, not linux. Constant vigilance the only answer.
 

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Have you checked to make sure that the W98 machines are not "bots" before you brag about them?
Nothing to check. The few business clients I have running 98 are not
connected to the internet with the computers in question and will never
need to be to run the business software they are using. Like I said,
if it works for what the user needs it for then that is key.

Personally I prefer my hackintosh machine over windows for most recreational internet use, such as right now. :D
As you said, because the Mac is less of a target that in itself makes it a safer choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Nothing to check. The few business clients I have running 98 are not
connected to the internet
with the computers in question and will never
need to be to run the business software they are using. Like I said,
if it works for what the user needs it for then that is key.

Personally I prefer my hackintosh machine over windows for most recreational internet use, such as right now. :D
As you said, because the Mac is less of a target that in itself makes it a safer choice.



I was given my first laptop, it was a Mac.........................................................................







..............................................................................................................................I gave it back. :grinz Seriously.


How's this for a "safe" set up? I''m browsing with "Ice Weasel" (cute white weasel wrapped around a green frozen globe-green ice oceans and white snow covered continents-perfect for lts), running on a Knoppix operating system, which is running from my RAM memory. I have no hard disks spinning. No windows. No Internet Explorer. No Safari. No apple with a bite out of it. No security software, if the os gets infected, it ceases to exist in a few nanoseconds after power off. I've been updated.

Perfect for recreational use. Or printing. Or programming. Or astronomy. Or science and math.

I am NOT, however, exposing my business to the net with this setup, that's why I took out my hard drives. A bit silly to talk about not needing to update your unsupported operating system when you are not on the net. I have some safe old operating systems in the closet in my attic. :D I saw some safe old systems at the dump.
 
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