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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to add hydraulics to my Ford F-700, the PTO pump is in place for the dump and plow controls and there is another port I can tap into for spreader controls. I've had better luck finding hydraulic spreaders for this truck vs. a large gas V-box. Is it worth doing? I know how to do the work, just wondering if its cost effective. Figuring $400-500 for hydraulic hoses and spreader controls, fittings, etc. Would only have to run 5 lines- 1 to the control from pump, 2 to the rear for spreader, and 2 return lines. Any thoughts - good or bad would be great.

Thanks Joe
 

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The hydraulic units are so much more reliable and trouble free.That's why you see so many of the big units available in hydraulic versions.

I would personaly look for a hydraulic undertailgate unit instead of a v-box.Much easier to take on and off,and a lot easier to run and maintain.You also have full use of the dump body with the unit still in place.

You seem to have a pretty good idea of what you need.I would find out the flow rating of your PTO pump,and if it's capable of constant duty for running a spreader.You need a pretty good pump to run a spreader.
 

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I've set up centrals on two trucks and I've learned more than I ever thought I wanted to know. For what seems a simple fluid power application there are a lot of little things that can bite.

You will need somewhere in the neighborhood of 15 GPM to run a spreader. I'm not sure what ratio a PTO runs at compared to crank RPM but you have to figure out what speed (RPM) you will be running at when spreading and work that into what GPM your pump will make at that speed.

You will also need a fairly big tank or a cooler to keep system temperature down. Even in cold weather my 20 gallon tank gets pretty warm on a long spreading run, I would consider that the minimum tankage.

You can tee both motor returns into one line at the rear. What I have seen done is to put one return hose into a tee with a male quick connect to hook to the truck and a female QC to plug the second hose into. I ran hard pipes and teed it to each side of the frame so I could keep my hoses as short as possible.

One drawback of running off a PTO pump is that you lose spreader function when you stop the vehicle. With my electrically clutched pump I can pull up to an intersection, or any spot that needs extra material, and just push the clutch and let the spreader lay down a heavy dose.

If that extra port you mention is a "power beyond" you will lose power to the spreader circuit when you raise the body or use the plow. I did that on my setup, rather than install a divider. A divider can be set to prioritize flow to the spreader and will keep spreader output constant through a range of pump input speeds. The drawback of low end dividers is that they make heat, which there is already too much of. I live with the variations in flow by trying to spread at a steady engine speed. It's kind of a pain losing the spreader when I tilt the body, but in most lots I can raise it enough for material to flow and leave it there for the entire lot.

Keep in mind that with any engine driven hydraulic system you need to calibrate the spreader at a cetain RPM and then hold that as close as possible when actually spreading. That is, of course, if you're trying to maintain a set application rate. That's more of a factor if you're doing long runs or streets.

I find that in my sites, which are relatively small, I spread at a given quadrant setting and usually run 2nd gear, high range at right around 2,000 RPM. On my truck that's #2 on the augers and 4 on the spinner side. If I have room enough to bring travel speed up I'll tweak the augers up to #3. If I want to lay a heavy band I'll drop spinner speed to #4. If I really want to cover area I can bring the revs up to about 3 grand and crank the spinner wide open and take the augers to 4 and cover 20' wide easily. I don't know exactly what my spread rate is but after several years I have a pretty good feel for what I need to apply and what works.
 

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Hydraulics

I want to add suspension hydraulics to my 2500 RAM , I want my truck to be "off the hinges " . I want to "slam" my truck when I get out and I want to hop at stop lights and that is with the plows mounted LOL . How do I do that ? pimp
 

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Another option, which isn't cheap is a "double pump". There are actually two pumps built into one supplying the same system. I am not 100% sure on how it works, however it allows for us to raise the body, plow, or wing with out shutting down the spreader.

Geoff
 

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The double pumps are actually two pumps in a common housing. Each has an independant in and out line and each powers seperate circuits. The only common points in such a system are the return lines and tank. They are used quite often in truck crane applications to enable multiple functions to be used without affecting each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just a short little update:

Still looking to add the hydraulics for the spreader, but I'm going to redo the entire hydraulic system in the process. If I'm going to spend the money I maight as well do it right the first time out. The PTO pump on the truck is a live pump - no stopping unless the clutch is in- its old and tired so I'm gonna replace it, still a PTO pump just bigger, all the control valves are worn and / or leak, and finally the spreader controls. My 400-500 dollar project now became around 1000-1200. Atleast in the long run I can get return on my investment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hydraulic Plumbing

:huh

Got a brain fart somewhere and I can't remeber which book I read it in. Can I plumb hydraulics with galvanized or black iron pipe? I know I can with the return lines and tie all of them together, but can I do it on the power side? One last question, once again forgive me, it's been several years since I rebuilt any central hydraulics, can I put the control valves in series, the dump and plow controls are single action with and open center, can I run my spreader controls through the valve or run the dump/plow controls off the return for the spreader control block, not all three will be used at the same time. At most the bed will be lifted occasionally to shift the salt back.

Thanks for the help.



Joe
 

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Alan said:


One drawback of running off a PTO pump is that you lose spreader function when you stop the vehicle. With my electrically clutched pump I can pull up to an intersection, or any spot that needs extra material, and just push the clutch and let the spreader lay down a heavy dose.


Most PTO pumps are driven off the transmission counter shaft,and will still work with the vehicle stopped.You just need to put it in neutral,and let the clutch out to drive the PTO.
 

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The long straight runs on my truck are black pipe, no reason you can't do it. Galvanized might last longer in the caustic environment.

Chris, the belt driven pumps are much more convenient than the PTO pumps, more similar to shaft driven pumps off the crankshaft. It eliminates the clutch/shifter/gas pedal ballet.
 
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