Snowplow Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good day,

I was looking for a little feedback on a couple fronts, first on plow type, than on manufacturer.

For the past 12+ years I have owned a Boss 8' straight blade plow, it was mounted on the front of a 2008 F150, I am aware that the plow was to big for the truck, but in my case the truck (with plow mounted) never left my commercial property. Now the truck is going to be replaced and I am considering a couple of choices. I would like to look into mounting a plow on my current commuter truck (2014 F150) and know I am limited to what I can shop for.

About my plowing, I own a 4 acre, blacktop parking lot that is home to a lot of semi trailers. The trailers are all around the perimeter of the lot, meaning that I can rarely plow one side to the other, I am often required to plow everything to the middle. With the straight blade that requires a lot of back and forth, side to side. Keeping the snow banks in front of the trailers as small as possible is of great benefit. There is also a lot of backdragging involved.

So, I was thinking a V plow would be helpful, and Boss does make a V plow intended for 1/2 ton trucks. Sno Way also makes a V plow intended for 1/2 ton trucks, and I went to the local dealer to see them in person (I have no experience with any other plow than the current Boss). I noticed they also offer a 8' blade plow with hydraulic wings, the 26R.

So, the first question is for those who have experience with a "power wing" blade plow, is do you think this would be better alternative to a V plow for my application? Did you consider a V plow prior to getting the winged plow?

Secondly, if I decide to go with a V plow, and the choices are the Boss vs Sno Way, what experiences do you have with each? The difference in weight is minimal (Boss HTX-v=490#, Snow Way 26V=550#)

Thanks in advance for any opinions, I am sure questions like this are asked here a lot, but I have had difficulty finding good info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Good day,

I was looking for a little feedback on a couple fronts, first on plow type, than on manufacturer.

For the past 12+ years I have owned a Boss 8' straight blade plow, it was mounted on the front of a 2008 F150, I am aware that the plow was to big for the truck, but in my case the truck (with plow mounted) never left my commercial property. Now the truck is going to be replaced and I am considering a couple of choices. I would like to look into mounting a plow on my current commuter truck (2014 F150) and know I am limited to what I can shop for.

About my plowing, I own a 4 acre, blacktop parking lot that is home to a lot of semi trailers. The trailers are all around the perimeter of the lot, meaning that I can rarely plow one side to the other, I am often required to plow everything to the middle. With the straight blade that requires a lot of back and forth, side to side. Keeping the snow banks in front of the trailers as small as possible is of great benefit. There is also a lot of backdragging involved.

So, I was thinking a V plow would be helpful, and Boss does make a V plow intended for 1/2 ton trucks. Sno Way also makes a V plow intended for 1/2 ton trucks, and I went to the local dealer to see them in person (I have no experience with any other plow than the current Boss). I noticed they also offer a 8' blade plow with hydraulic wings, the 26R.

So, the first question is for those who have experience with a "power wing" blade plow, is do you think this would be better alternative to a V plow for my application? Did you consider a V plow prior to getting the winged plow?

Secondly, if I decide to go with a V plow, and the choices are the Boss vs Sno Way, what experiences do you have with each? The difference in weight is minimal (Boss HTX-v=490#, Snow Way 26V=550#)

Thanks in advance for any opinions, I am sure questions like this are asked here a lot, but I have had difficulty finding good info.

Have you entered your cab/engine info in the product match to verify that your 2014 can even take a plow? Because of the electric power steering assist, many (most?) models for that year can NOT take a plow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
Good day,

I was looking for a little feedback on a couple fronts, first on plow type, than on manufacturer.

For the past 12+ years I have owned a Boss 8' straight blade plow, it was mounted on the front of a 2008 F150, I am aware that the plow was to big for the truck, but in my case the truck (with plow mounted) never left my commercial property. Now the truck is going to be replaced and I am considering a couple of choices. I would like to look into mounting a plow on my current commuter truck (2014 F150) and know I am limited to what I can shop for.

About my plowing, I own a 4 acre, blacktop parking lot that is home to a lot of semi trailers. The trailers are all around the perimeter of the lot, meaning that I can rarely plow one side to the other, I am often required to plow everything to the middle. With the straight blade that requires a lot of back and forth, side to side. Keeping the snow banks in front of the trailers as small as possible is of great benefit. There is also a lot of backdragging involved.

So, I was thinking a V plow would be helpful, and Boss does make a V plow intended for 1/2 ton trucks. Sno Way also makes a V plow intended for 1/2 ton trucks, and I went to the local dealer to see them in person (I have no experience with any other plow than the current Boss). I noticed they also offer a 8' blade plow with hydraulic wings, the 26R.

So, the first question is for those who have experience with a "power wing" blade plow, is do you think this would be better alternative to a V plow for my application? Did you consider a V plow prior to getting the winged plow?

Secondly, if I decide to go with a V plow, and the choices are the Boss vs Sno Way, what experiences do you have with each? The difference in weight is minimal (Boss HTX-v=490#, Snow Way 26V=550#)

Thanks in advance for any opinions, I am sure questions like this are asked here a lot, but I have had difficulty finding good info.

The function you seem to need is the scoop function. Which is only available with a v plow. i don’t think a wing plow will give you the same amount of capacity as the v in scoop mode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Regardless of the expandable vs V debate, there is no expandable that is suitable for any model of F150 anyway even in the best case. In the case of the boss, the expandable weighs more than double the HTX V.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
Regardless of the expandable vs V debate, there is no expandable that is suitable for any model of F150 anyway even in the best case. In the case of the boss, the expandable weighs more than double the HTX V.
Why not tell him about 100% positive traction...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Have you entered your cab/engine info in the product match to verify that your 2014 can even take a plow? Because of the electric power steering assist, many (most?) models for that year can NOT take a plow.

I have entered info into both the SnoWay and Boss sites, and the SnoWay site says both the 26V and 26R will work on my truck, Boss says yes to any 7.5 foot plows (including V).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The function you seem to need is the scoop function. Which is only available with a v plow. i don’t think a wing plow will give you the same amount of capacity as the v in scoop mode.
Thanks!! This is what I would like to know more about. I can not find exact info on moving capacity on the Boss, SnoWay claims the winged plow will move 3.2 cubic yards in 45 degree box mode, and 3.6 in 90 degree box mode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Regardless of the expandable vs V debate, there is no expandable that is suitable for any model of F150 anyway even in the best case. In the case of the boss, the expandable weighs more than double the HTX V.
I could be using the terms wrong, by expandable I assume your talking about a plow that "extends" from one length to another? Such as the Boss EXT? The SnoWay plow I am referring to is a fixed length plow that has hydraulic controlled wings that open and close to create a "boxed" plow. Boss does not offer a plow with this function for my 1/2 ton truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
Yes, please do. Any info is good info
100% positive traction was the motto of the now defunct Walter Truck Company of New York State... it was how they described their specific brand of all-wheel-drive that included torque portioning automatically locking differentials. So, the idea is this the trucks’ used three differentials 1) front axle , 2) the center differential and 3) the rear axle. No, transfer case. So, as the traction condition change front to rear and left to right the differentials would lock up transmit power to the wheel(s)that grip(s) and leave the slipping wheel(s) with less power. This gave them more tractive effort to the gripping wheels thus positive traction with 100% utilization hence the name.

As for the v plow I think it will be effective but the question is how much snow do you get a year?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
The v plow can also have one blade extend with the opposite side angled to create an L shape that might be very useful to you plowing around trailers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
100% positive traction was the motto of the now defunct Walter Truck Company of New York State... it was how they described their specific brand of all-wheel-drive that included torque portioning automatically locking differentials. So, the idea is this the trucks’ used three differentials 1) front axle , 2) the center differential and 3) the rear axle. No, transfer case. So, as the traction condition change front to rear and left to right the differentials would lock up transmit power to the wheel(s)that grip(s) and leave the slipping wheel(s) with less power. This gave them more tractive effort to the gripping wheels thus positive traction with 100% utilization hence the name.

As for the v plow I think it will be effective but the question is how much snow do you get a year?
OK, Got it!!

We average 43+ inches per year, some years are better than others, we received 39 inches in February this year. Being as I only do this lot, I have the luxury of plowing multiple time during one storm, I would rather plow 3-4 inches twice than 8 inches once.

Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Yes boss does not offer that type of plow for a 1/2 ton.
The snow way seems like the best option.
Yep, that is the dilemma. Only having experience with a straight blade, I am having difficulty determining weather the winged plow or V plow would be better for my application. Both have pros and cons.

Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
OK, Got it!!

We average 43+ inches per year, some years are better than others, we received 39 inches in February this year. Being as I only do this lot, I have the luxury of plowing multiple time during one storm, I would rather plow 3-4 inches twice than 8 inches once.

Thanks!!
Also, I mentioned it because some other users here continue to mention it over at another plow site.com. (Just with no spaces.) it gets more traffic but that doesn’t necessarily mean more helpful... it is their running joke since I got banned about 1 year ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
699 Posts
Why not tell him about 100% positive traction...
That it’s a myth.

Traction is based on the friction coefficient between the two services at hand.

If one of the surfaces is ice and the other one is a hard tire there cannot be 100% positive traction coefficient. Period.

All it is the marketing slogan,
That is all .

As for the snowplow a containment plow like one with the expandable wings and a Vee of the same length would have the same surface area and the same snow moving or containment capability

Could put wings on the plow to reach under them farther oall of them are going to be too heavy for a new f150 and they will most likely void your trucks warranty .

So enjoy your new truck but you’re better off hiring this out or buying an older three-quarter ton truck and put in the right plow on it.


Ps anytime my vehicle moves without the tires spinning I have 100% positive traction ....
It is a fact
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
That it’s a myth.

Traction is based on the friction coefficient between the two services at hand.

If one of the surfaces is ice and the other one is a hard tire there cannot be 100% positive traction coefficient. Period.

All it is the marketing slogan,
That is all .

As for the snowplow a containment plow like one with the expandable wings and a Vee of the same length would have the same surface area and the same snow moving or containment capability

Could put wings on the plow to reach under them farther oall of them are going to be too heavy for a new f150 and they will most likely void your trucks warranty .

So enjoy your new truck but you’re better off hiring this out or buying an older three-quarter ton truck and put in the right plow on it.


Ps anytime my vehicle moves without the tires spinning I have 100% positive traction ....
It is a fact
It’s called traction control... it has nothing to do with creating traction other then taking power from the wheels that slip and applying it to the wheels that grip.

Sure if any truck is on a complete sheet of ice with tires that cannot achieve a specific resistance to the surface it will slide or spin. That isn’t a claim of the company at all. But if you have say studs or tire chains and two, three or even one wheel gets traction the system will divert the power to those wheels and in theory at least the truck should move forwards.

You’re really telling the obvious aren’t you. Yes anytime wheels aren’t spinning they have 100% of the traction available. But see my first statement this traction control... so it implies under conditions when said vehicle wouldn’t have traction to all wheels. Thus you have two options: 1) lock the axles to ensure power is given to each side no matter what or 2) lock the axles and dived the power in favor of the wheel that grips instead of the other slipping side. Option to gives you the power where it does the most good and usually makes it more controllable. Hence the reason AWD cars use fractional to make them safer on the road in difficult conditions. And a very popular system is the torqesen differential system which is nearly identical in design and function as the Walter differential.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
699 Posts
It’s called traction control... it has nothing to do with creating traction other then taking power from the wheels that slip and applying it to the wheels that grip.

Sure if any truck is on a complete sheet of ice with tires that cannot achieve a specific resistance to the surface it will slide or spin. That isn’t a claim of the company at all. But if you have say studs or tire chains and two, three or even one wheel gets traction the system will divert the power to those wheels and in theory at least the truck should move forwards.

You’re really telling the obvious aren’t you. Yes anytime wheels aren’t spinning they have 100% of the traction available. But see my first statement this traction control... so it implies under conditions when said vehicle wouldn’t have traction to all wheels. Thus you have two options: 1) lock the axles to ensure power is given to each side no matter what or 2) lock the axles and dived the power in favor of the wheel that grips instead of the other slipping side. Option to gives you the power where it does the most good and usually makes it more controllable. Hence the reason AWD cars use fractional to make them safer on the road in difficult conditions. And a very popular system is the torqesen differential system which is nearly identical in design and function as the Walter differential.
you say your all about helping others.....

how did your response help the OP with his plow selection.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top