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Old 12-22-2006, 01:57 PM
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Wood Gantry Crane????

Hello,

Just wondering what type of lumber (laminated beam, 4x, 6x, etc....if any?) can be built to create a 20' long(full width of shop) overhead support to attach a chain hoist to?

I need to be able to lift 2,000 lbs.(machinery, spreader, 55 gal. drums, spray tanks, etc.) out of or into vehicles at my shop and just trying to see if there is a way to do this with a material(wood) I am familair working with.

In case you havent figured it out, I am not a versed welder.

I realize steel will work fine. I also have researched steel mobil gantry cranes for the 2,000 lift capacity and they begin at roughly $1,000 to $3,000.

Any thoughts or real world experience would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance - Joe
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Old 12-22-2006, 03:26 PM
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I don't trust wood for that application, when it fails it fails completely and with loud cracking noises.

No welding required, put a steel section on top of built up posts in your walls. An S12x35 (12" high, 35 lbs per lin. ft.) would probably be enough for that. You could put a trolley on it and have side to side movement of your loads as well as up and down. I'd have an engineer check the loads on it to be safe. My barnyard experience says it should be fine with the ends unrestrained (sitting loose on posts) and you could probably go quite a bit lighter if you bolted it to steel columns with a short brace at each column. Doing it in steel can be planned to use bolted connections at the beam, all you would need to do is get base plates welded to the bottom of the columns.
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Old 12-22-2006, 04:44 PM
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General rule of thumb for 2" dimentional lumber is length of span, divide by 2, add 1 and that will give you your needed JOIST size. Obviously, steel is the better material. But, barring that, a laminated 2x12 would work, although I'd use 2x14's. Use rough cut hemlock, if available, as it will bend before breaking. Quadruple up 4 of them with crown up and glue and nail the heck out of it. Your other option would be a couple manufactured wood beams, either I beams or versilam(?) I think they're called. The wood nascor I beams are pretty stout for this application. Do not use spruce or pine from home despot or Lowe bid. You'll make yourself a nice pile of kindling with that stuff.

Keep in mind, you're going to loose a pile of head room with this. 14", plus the distance for you pully/shieve block under the beam. You'll need 3-4' above the top of the item being lifted.
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Old 12-22-2006, 09:57 PM
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Thanks guys for your responses!

Can you provide any pictures of such a beam (or like kind)??

A picture would be of great help to me. What kind of mount(on a wood beam) for the chain hoist do you use? Is it a stationary, single lift point or can it "trolly" down a wood beam?

Can I assume that for my application, steel is the recommended material of choice........ or do we, as creative Americans, "build up" the material that we are familiar with?

I GREATLY apppreciate the detailed and informative answers!

Joe
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Old 12-23-2006, 12:17 AM
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I would stick with steel if possible. I've got a couple different things I have done, I'll grab a couple pics today.
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Old 12-23-2006, 04:26 AM
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Steel I beam would be my first choice, like Alan stated you can have the supplier weld anything you need to the posts. The trolley set up would be worth it alone.

As far as wood goes Micro Lams would be the strongest product you can purchase from the Lumber yard. If you have a local Hines Lumber,or Stock Lumber they have engineering software in house from Micro Lam they can run for you. Hem Fir here is at a premium, most just stock Southern Yellow now except for 28' ers plus. Best have lots in the account for those puppys.

I would think 2-14" Micro Lams glued and nailed will span that with out a problem and support a ton easily, it is a point load so have the lumber yard check to be sure. Solid posts on solid footings would be required for Laminated beems or steel.
T
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Old 12-23-2006, 04:41 AM
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From my experance I'm going to say steal over wood. For what you are tell use and you want to span Steal is the only way to go. The cost of getting enough wood in there to do the job you spend a little more and install steal and still have head room and a troly track too. With years and years of worry free service.

No welding experance needed a good welding shop can fab up ever thing you need and it goes up like any wood framing. Just bolt it together.

Rich
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Old 12-23-2006, 06:12 AM
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Northern tool has them pretty cheap.It will probably cost you more to have one fabbed.These are on wheels and portable in case you need to move it,or use it outside.They will also accept a trolley as well.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...136&Ne=2000001
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Old 12-23-2006, 10:40 AM
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Hello and thanks for the responses!

I think steel will be the way to go.

I have seen a few used gantry's on ebay for a decent price, but I will have to go multiple states away to pick it up. Not to sure its worth it(fuel, time, etc.)?

Has anyone used a floor mounted jib crane like this.............

http://estore.sjf.com/sjf.nsf/vwAllD...ount=5&EndVars

I have a price of $1,387.98 for a 2000# capacity floor mount jib crane (99 1/2" under beam to floor - 4" x 8" I-Beam), quick install manual trolly (2,000# cap.) and a hand chain hoist (2,000# cap. - 10'-0" lift). What do you think?

Im still waiting on the anchorage details for the base to concrete. Well see??
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Old 12-23-2006, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoSnow
Hello and thanks for the responses!

I think steel will be the way to go.

I have seen a few used gantry's on ebay for a decent price, but I will have to go multiple states away to pick it up. Not to sure its worth it(fuel, time, etc.)?

Has anyone used a floor mounted jib crane like this.............

http://estore.sjf.com/sjf.nsf/vwAllD...ount=5&EndVars

I have a price of $1,387.98 for a 2000# capacity floor mount jib crane (99 1/2" under beam to floor - 4" x 8" I-Beam), quick install manual trolly (2,000# cap.) and a hand chain hoist (2,000# cap. - 10'-0" lift). What do you think?

Im still waiting on the anchorage details for the base to concrete. Well see??
Jib cranes are limited by the length and the swing of the boom.You also cannot move them around,so you must always use them in the same spot.

Follow the link above,Northern tool has the same crane for less $$$.Not to mention they have really good sale prices if you can find it on sale too.Harbour Freight may be another place to check.
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Old 12-23-2006, 11:57 AM
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Thanks Wyldman.......

Yea, I know Northern tool all too well! I just ordered their "eliminator" waste oil heater this past week. It should be here within 5-10 days.

Its strange, but I tend to invest money in these "fantastic f*ckin bursts" when we have no snow approaching our area. I constantly feel that I have to max out whatever free time I can muster between any possible snow activity for non-direct revenue generating business items. You should see my personal "to do list", it is getting shorter by the day.

I think your right........ the mobile steel gantry crane is the way to go!

Thanks again - Joe
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